Archives for posts with tag: Seattle Seahawks

You’ve waited almost all Winter for this.

You found out who your team was going to play and you even knew where.

It was the when that kept you up at night.

Wonder no more. Your patience has been rewarded (even if it was a couple of weeks late).

The 2020 National Football League regular season schedule was released by the league last May. “The release of the NFL schedule is something our fans eagerly anticipate every year, as they look forward with hope and optimism to the season ahead,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell told NFL Network and USA Today. “In preparing to play the season as scheduled, we will continue to make our decisions based on the latest medical and public health advice, in compliance with government regulations, and with appropriate safety protocols to protect the health of our fans, players, club and league personnel and our communities. We will be prepared to make adjustments as necessary, as we have during this off-season in safely and efficiently conducting key activities such as free agency, the virtual off-season program, and the 2020 NFL Draft.”

The NFL’s 101st season begins with the league’s annual prime-time kickoff game, as the defending Super Bowl Champion Kansas City Chiefs hosts Houston at Arrowhead Stadium on September 10 at 8:20 p.m. on NBC in a rematch of the AFC Divisional playoffs.

Week 1 is a FOX national weekend with key divisional games on Sunday, September 13, featuring Tampa Bay traveling to the Big Easy to face off against New Orleans at 4:25 p.m. and Arizona visiting San Francisco at 4:25 p.m. CBS kicks off its coverage in Week 1 with a host of rivalry games, including Baltimore welcoming Cleveland at 1 p.m. and Miami traveling to Foxboro to face AFC East rival New England at 1 p.m.

The 2020 NFL schedule, Powered by AWS, features the debut of two world-class venues – SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles and Allegiant Stadium in Las Vegas. The Los Angeles Rams will meet Dallas on NBC’s Sunday Night Football at 8:20 p.m. on September 13 in their new home while the Los Angeles Chargers welcome the Chiefs to SoFi Stadium in Week 2 on September 20 at 4:25 p.m. on CBS. Also in Week 2, the Raiders host the first-ever regular-season NFL game in Las Vegas at Allegiant Stadium when they face New Orleans on ESPN’s Monday Night Football at 8:15 p.m., with a simulcast on ABC, on the 50th anniversary of the first Monday Night Football game in 1970.

The ESPN slate begins with a Kickoff Weekend doubleheader. The New York Giants will host Pittsburgh on September 14 at 7:15 p.m. in the first game, followed by Tennessee visiting Denver in the nightcap at 10:10 p.m. ESPN will televise one game each Monday night in Weeks 2-16. There will be no Monday night game on the final regular-season weekend (Week 17) to provide more flexibility for the scheduling of the opening weekend of the NFL playoffs.

All 32 clubs are again scheduled for at least one nationally televised Thursday, Sunday or Monday game. Thursday Night Football will air exclusively on NFL Network in Weeks 2-4, while FOX kicks off its Thursday night slate in Week 5. FOX will broadcast 10 Thursday Night Football games between Weeks 5-15 (excluding Thanksgiving night) as well as the Friday, December 25, game between Minnesota and New Orleans at 4:30 p.m. Those FOX games are slated to be simulcast via NFL Network, distributed in Spanish on FOX Deportes and streamed on Amazon Prime Video, beginning with Tampa Bay at Chicago on October 8.

NFL Network will exclusively televise seven games – with FOX producing the full slate of 18 games – including a very special Thursday night contest on September 17. On that day, the 100th birthday of the National Football League, Cleveland hosts Cincinnati at 8:20 p.m., with the NFL Network broadcast paying tribute to the birthplace of the NFL in nearby Canton, Ohio.

A select number of games will be “cross-flexed,” moving between CBS and FOX to bring potentially under-distributed games to wider audiences. Some of those contests were announced today and other “cross-flexed” games will be decided during the season.

Thanksgiving will feature a triple-header on Thursday, November 26. The first game will send Houston to the Motor City for an early afternoon showdown with Detroit at 12:30 p.m. on CBS. The late afternoon game will feature Washington visiting Dallas at 4:30 p.m. on FOX in a battle of NFC East rivals and the Thanksgiving Day festivities conclude with an AFC North showdown as Baltimore travels to Pittsburgh to face the Steelers on NBC at 8:20 p.m.

The regular season will conclude with Week 17 on Sunday, January 3. For the 12th consecutive year, all 16 games scheduled for Week 17 are division contests, enhancing the potential for more games with playoff ramifications. The NFL’s 32 teams will each play 16 games over 17 weeks. Byes will begin in Week 5 and end in Week 13. “Flexible scheduling” will be used in Weeks 11-17. Additionally, in Weeks 5-10, flexible scheduling may be used in no more than two weeks. In Weeks 5-16, the schedule lists the games tentatively set for Sunday Night Football on NBC. Only Sunday afternoon games are eligible to be moved to Sunday night, in which case the tentatively scheduled Sunday night game would be moved to an afternoon start time.
For Week 17, the Sunday night game will be announced no later than six days prior to January 3. The schedule does not list a Sunday night game in Week 17 but an afternoon game with playoff implications will be moved to that time slot. Flexible scheduling ensures quality match-ups in all Sunday time slots in those weeks and gives “surprise” teams a chance to play their way into prime-time.

Flexible scheduling will not be applied to games airing on Thursday or Monday nights. In each of Weeks 15 and 16, up to three of five designated matchups will be played on Saturday with the remainder to be played on Sunday. Specific dates and start times for such designated Week 15 and Week 16 matchups will be determined and announced no later than four weeks prior to game day.

Beginning this year, two additional Wild Card teams – one each in the American and National Football Conferences – will qualify for the playoffs. The number 1 seed in each conference will receive a bye in the Wild Card round. The remaining division champions in each conference with the best records will be seeded 2, 3 and 4, followed by the next three teams per conference with the best records seeded 5, 6 and 7. AFC and NFC Wild Card games will feature the 2 seed hosting the 7 seed, the 3 seed hosting the 6 seed and the 4 seed hosting the 5 seed.

Wild Card Weekend for the 2020 season will consist of three games on Saturday, January 9 and three games on Sunday, January 10, 2021.

The NFL last expanded the playoffs for the 1990 season, increasing from 10 to 12 the number of teams to qualify for the postseason. Since 1990, at least four new teams have qualified for the playoffs that missed the postseason the year before – a streak of 30 consecutive seasons. Wild Card Weekend winners join the top division champions in each conference in the Divisional Playoffs on Saturday and Sunday, January 16-17. The AFC and NFC Championship Games will be played on Sunday, January 24. The winners meet two weeks later on Sunday, February 7, in Super Bowl LV at Tampa Bay’s Raymond James Stadium (CBS).

The NFL is the only sports league that presents all regular-season and postseason games on free, over-the-air television in local markets. All postseason games are televised nationally. Westwood One will broadcast on radio all NFL prime-time games, the three Thanksgiving Day games and the entire NFL playoffs.

Fans can experience exciting NFL match-ups in person by visiting their favorite team’s website, http://www.nfl.com/tickets or on any NFL licensed ticketing channel. When purchasing tickets, be sure to look for the authenticated NFL ticket logo or the NFL shield.

2020 NFL SCHEDULE (Times are Eastern and subject to change)

WEEK 1
Thursday, September 10
Houston at Kansas City Chiefs, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Sunday, September 13
Seattle at ATLANTA, 1 p.m. on FOX
Cleveland at Baltimore, 1 p.m. on CBS
New York Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m. on CBS
Las Vegas at Carolina, 1 p.m. on CBS
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m. on FOX
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. on CBS
Green Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m. on FOX
Miami at New England, 1 p.n. on CBS
Philadelphia at Washington, 1 p.m. on FOX
Los Angeles Chargers at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Dallas at Los Angeles Rams, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, September 14
Pittsburgh at New York Giants, 7:15 p.m. on ESPN
Tennessee at Denver, 10:10 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 2
Thursday, September 17
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 8:20 p.m. on NFL Network

Sunday, September 20
ATLANTA at Dallas, 1 p.m. on FOX
New York Giants at Chicago, 1 p.n. on CBS
Detroit at Green Bay, 1 p.m. on FOX
Minnesota at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. on FOX
Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m. on CBS
San Francisco at New York Jets, 1 p.m. on FOX
Los Angeles Rams at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. on FOX
Denver at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. on CBS
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. on FOX
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m. on CBS
Washington at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. on FOX
Baltimore at Houston, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Kansas City at Los Angeles Chargers, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
New England at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, September 21
New Orleans at Las Vegas, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 3
Thursday, September 24
Miami at Jacksonville, 8:20 p.m. on NFL Network

Sunday, September 27
Chicago at Atlanta, 1 p.m. on FOX
Los Angeles Rams at Buffalo, 1 p.m. on FOX
Washington at Cleveland, 1 p.m. on FOX
Tennessee at Minnesota, 1 p.m. on CBS
Las Vegas at New England, 1 p.m. on CBS
San Francisco at New York Giants, 1 p.m. on FOX
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. on CBS
Houston at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. on CBS
New York Jets at Indianapolis, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
Carolina at Los Angeles Chargers, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
Detroit at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Dallas at Seattle, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Green Bay at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, September 28, 2020
Kansas City at Baltimore, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 4
Thursday, October 1
Denver at New York Jets, 8:20 p.m. NFL Network

Sunday, October 4
Arizona at Carolina, 1 p.m. on FOX
Indianapolis at Chicago, 1 p.m. on CBS
Jacksonville at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. on CBS
Cleveland at Dallas, 1 p.m. on FOX
New Orleans at Detroit, 1 p.m. on FOX
Minnesota at Houston, 1 p.m. on FOX
Seattle at Miami, 1 p.m. on FOX
Los Angeles Chargers at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. on CBS
Pittsburgh at Tennessee, 1 p.m. on CBS
Baltimore at Washington, 1 p.m. on CBS
New York Giants at Los Angeles Rams, 4:05 p.m. on FOX
New England at Kansas City, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Buffalo at Las Vegas, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Philadelphia at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, October 5
ATLANTA at Green Bay, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 5
Thursday, October 8
Tampa Bay at Chicago, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFLNetwork and Amazon*

Sunday, October 11
Carolina at ATLANTA, 1 p.m. on FOX
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m. on CBS
Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m. on CBS
Las Vegas at Kansas City, 1 p.m. on CBS
Denver at New England, 1 p.m. on CBS
Arizona at New York Jets, 1 p.m. on FOX
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. on FOX
Buffalo at Tennessee, 1 p.m. on CBS
Los Angeles Rams at Washington, 1 p.m. onp FOX
Miami Dolphins at San Francisco 49ers 1:05p (PT) 4:05p FOX
Indianapolis at Cleveland, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
New York Giants at Dallas, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Minnesota at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, October 12
Los Angeles Chargers at New Orleans, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 6
Thursday, October 15
Kansas City at Buffalo, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Sunday, October 18
ATLANTA at Minnesota, 1 p.m. on FOX
Chicago at Carolina, 1 p.m. on FOX
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. on FOX
Detroit at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. on FOX
Washington at New York Giants, 1 p.m. on FOX
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. on CBS
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. on CBS
Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m. on CBS
Miami at Denver, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
New York Jets at Los Angeles Chargers, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
Green Bay at Tampa Bay, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Los Angeles Rams at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m. NBC

Monday, October 19
Arizona at Dallas, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 7
Thursday, October 22
New York Giants at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Sunday, October 25
Detroit at ATLANTA, 1 p.m. on FOX
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 1 p.m. on CBS
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. on CBS
Green Bay at Houston, 1 p.m. on FOX
Los Angeles Chargers at Miami, 1 p.m. on CBS
Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m. on FOX
Buffalo at New York Jets, 1 p.m. on CBS
Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m. on FOX
Seattle at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. on FOX
Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
San Francisco at New England, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Tampa Bay at Las Vegas, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, October 26
Chicago at Los Angeles Rams, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 8
Thursday, October 29
ATLANTA at Carolina, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Sunday, November 1
New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m. on CBS
Tennessee at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. on CBS
Las Vegas at Cleveland, 1 p.m. on FOX
Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m. on CBS
Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m. on FOX
New York Jets at Kansas City, 1 p.m. on CBS
Los Angeles Rams at Miami, 1 p.m. on FOX
Jacksonville at Los Angeles Chargers, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
New Orleans at Chicago, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
San Francisco at Seattle, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, November 2
Tampa Bay at New York Giants, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 9
Thursday, November 5
Green Bay at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Sunday, November 8
Denver at ATLANTA, 1 p.m. on CBS
Seattle at Buffalo, 1 p.m. on FOX
Baltimore at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. on CBS
Houston at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. on CBS
Carolina at Kansas City, 1 p.m. on FOX
Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m. on CBS
Chicago at Tennessee, 1 o.m. on FOX
New York Giants at Washington, 1 p.m. on FOX
Las Vegas at Los Angeles Chargers, 4:05 p.m. on FOX
Miami at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Pittsburgh at Dallas, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, November 9
New England at New York Jets, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 10
Thursday, November 12
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Sunday, November 15
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m. on FOX
Houston at Cleveland, 1 p.m. on FOX
Washington at Detroit, 1 p.m. on FOX
Jacksonville at Green Bay, 1 p.m. on FOX
Philadelphia at New York Giants, 1 p.m. on FOX
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. on FOX
Buffalo at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
Denver at Las Vegas, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
New York Jets at Miami, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
Seattle at Los Angeles Rams, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Baltimore at New England, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, November 16
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 11
Thursday, November 19
Arizona at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Sunday, November 22
ATLANTA at New Orleans, 1 p.m. on FOX
Tennessee at Baltimore, 1 p.m. on CBS
Detroit at Carolina, 1 p.m. on FOX
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 1 p.m. on FOX
New England at Houston, 1 p.m. on CBS
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. on FOX
Pittsburgh at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. on CBS
Cincinnati at Washington, 1 p.m. on CBS
Los Angeles Chargers at Denver, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
Dallas at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Kansas City at Las Vegas, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, November 23
Los Angeles Rams at Tampa Bay, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 12
Thursday, November 26 (THANKSGIVING IN UNITED STATES)
Houston at Detroit, 12:30 p.m. on CBS
Washington at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. on FOX
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Sunday, November 29
Las Vegas at ATLANTA, 1 p.m. on CBS
Los Angeles Chargers at Buffalo, 1 p.m. on CBS
New York Giants at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. on FOX
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. on CBS
Cleveland at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. on CBS
Carolina at Minnesota, 1 p.m. on FOX
Arizona at New England, 1 p.m. on FOX
Miami at New York Jets, 1 p.m. on CBS
New Orleans at Denver, 1 p.m. on FOX
San Francisco at Los Angeles Rams, 4:05 p.m. on FOX
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Chicago Bears at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, November 30
Seattle at Philadelphia, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 13
Thursday, December 3
Dallas at Baltimore, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Sunday, December 6
New Orleans at ATLANTA, 1 p.m. on FOX
Detroit at Chicago, 1 p.m. on FOX
Indianapolis at Houston, 1 p.m. on CBS
Cincinnati at Miami, 1 p.m. on CBS
Jacksonville at Minnesota, 1 p.m. on CBS
Las Vegas at New York Jets, 1 p.m. on CBS
Washington at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. on FOX
Cleveland at Tennessee, 1 p.m. on CBS
Los Angeles Rams at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. on FOX
New York Giants at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. on FOX
Philadelphia at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
New England at Los Angeles Chargers, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Denver at Kansas City, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, December 7
Buffalo at San Francisco, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 14
Thursday, December 10
New England at Los Angeles Rams, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Sunday, December 13
ATLANTA at Los Angeles Chargers, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Denver at Carolina, 1 p.m. on CBS
Houston at Chicago, 1 p.m. on CBS
Dallas at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. on FOX
Green Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m. on FOX
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. on CBS
Kansas City at Miami, 1 p.m. on CBS
Arizona at New York Giants, 1 p.m. on FOX
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. on FOX
Indianapolis at Las Vegas, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
New York Jets at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. on CBS
New Orleans at Philadelphia, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Washington at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Pittsburgh Steelers at Buffalo, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, December 14
Baltimore at Cleveland, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 15
Thursday, December 17
Los Angeles Chargers at Las Vegas, 8:20 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Saturday, December 19
TBD vs. TBD, 4:30 p.m. on NFL Network
TBD vs. TBD, 8:15 p.m. on NFL Network

Saturday, December 19 or Sunday, December 20 – Date/Time/Network TBD
Buffalo at Denver – Date, Time and Network TBD
Carolina at Green Bay – Date, Time and Network TBD
Houston at Indianapolis – Date, Time and Network TBD
New York Jets at Los Angeles Rams – Date, Time and Network TBD
Detroit at Tennessee – Date, Time and Network TBD

Sunday, December 20
Tampa Bay at ATLANTA, 1 p.m. on FOX
Jacksonville at Baltimore, 1 p.m. on CBS
New England at Miami, 1 p.m. on CBS
Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m. on FOX
Cleveland at New York Giants, 1 p.m. on CBS
Seattle at Washington, 1 p.m. on FOX
Philadelphia at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. on FOX
Kansas City at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
San Francisco at Dallas, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, December 21
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 16
Friday, December 25
Minnesota at New Orleans, 4:30 p.m. on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon*

Saturday, December 26
TBD vs. TBD, 4:30 p.m. on NFL Network
TBD vs. TBD, 8:15 p.m. on NFL Network

Saturday, December 26 or Sunday, December 27 – Date/Time/Network TBD
San Francisco at Arizona – Date/Time/Network TBD
Tampa Bay at Detroit – Date/Time/Network TBD
Denver at Los Angeles Chargers – Date/Time/Network TBD
Miami at Las Vegas – Date/Time/Network TBD
Cleveland at New York Jets – Date/Time/Network TBD

Sunday, December 27
ATLANTA at Kansas City, 1 p.m. on FOX
New York Giants at Baltimore, 1 p.m. on FOX
Cincinnati at Houston, 1 p.m. on CBS
Chicago at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. on FOX
Indianapolis at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. on CBS
Carolina at Washington, 1 p.m. on CBS
Los Angeles Rams at Seattle, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Philadelphia at Dallas, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Tennessee at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m. on NBC

Monday, December 28
Buffalo at New England, 8:15 p.m. on ESPN

WEEK 17
Sunday, January 3
ATLANTA at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. on FOX
Miami at Buffalo, 1 p.m. on CBS
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m. on FOX
Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m. on FOX
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. on CBS
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m. on CBS
Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m. on FOX
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m. on CBS
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. on CBS
Los Angeles Chargers at Kansas City, 1 p.m. on CBS
New York Jets at New England, 1 p.m. on CBS
Dallas at New York Giants, 1 p.m. on FOX
Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. on FOX
Las Vegas at Denver, 4:25 p.m. on CBS
Arizona at Los Angeles Rams, 4:25 p.m. on FOX
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. on FOX

* NFL Network and Amazon simulcast subject to change

NFL clubs voted to expand the postseason by two teams beginning with the 2020 season. Expanding the NFL postseason was addressed in the new NFL-NFLPA Collective Bargaining Agreement. Players and clubs both recognized that nothing energizes fans like the chance to see their team qualify for the playoffs and compete for the Super Bowl.

The vote took place during a league meeting held remotely follows the recommendation of the Competition Committee, Management Council Executive Committee and Media Committee on increasing the number of playoff teams from 12 to 14.

Two additional Wild Card teams – one each in the American and National Football Conferences – will qualify for the playoffs. The No. 1 seed in each conference will receive a bye in the Wild Card round. The remaining division champions in each conference with the best records will be seeded 2, 3 and 4, followed by the next three teams per conference with the best records seeded 5, 6 and 7.

AFC and NFC Wild Card games will feature the 2 seed hosting the 7 seed, the 3 seed hosting the 6 seed and the 4 seed hosting the 5 seed.

Wild Card Weekend for the 2020 season will consist of three games on Saturday, January 9 and three games on Sunday, January 10, 2021.

CBS will broadcast one additional Wild Card game on January 10 with kickoff at approximately 4:40 p.m. Eastern. The game will also be available via a livestream on CBS All Access. Additionally, as part of CBS’ coverage, a separately produced telecast of the game will air on Nickelodeon, tailored for a younger audience.

NBC, its new streaming service Peacock, as well as Telemundo will all broadcast an additional Wild Card game on January 10 with kickoff at approximately 8:15 p.m. Eastern.

​The NFL last expanded the playoffs for the 1990 season, increasing from 10 to 12 the number of teams to qualify for the postseason. Since 1990, at least four new teams have qualified for the playoffs that missed the postseason the year before – a streak of 30 consecutive seasons.

The 2020 NFL Draft will be presented across ABC, ESPN and NFL Network, April 23 through April 25 – the second straight year that The Walt Disney Company has worked with the National Football League to offer a multi-network presentation for all seven rounds. The 2020 NFL Draft will serve as a three-day virtual fundraiser benefitting six charities that are battling the spread of COVID-19 and delivering relief to millions in need. The National Football League, ESPN and ABC hope the 2020 NFL Draft will bring fans a small but welcome diversion in the middle of a difficult and unprecedented time.

ESPN and NFL Network will combine to offer a singular presentation across both networks, while ABC will present its own distinctive, prime-time telecasts for rounds 1 through 3, in addition to simulcasting the ESPN and NFL Network telecast of rounds 4-7.

The 2020 NFL Draft telecasts – originally scheduled to be on-site in Las Vegas, Nevada – will now originate from ESPN’s Bristol, Connecticut., studios and adhere to proper social distancing guidelines and local workplace rules due to COVID-19. Draft hosts and a limited number of commentators will be in-studio while a majority of the analysts, reporters and other experts will contribute remotely from home studios. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell will introduce the picks from his home.

As previously announced, the NFL Draft will also feature a “Draft-A-Thon” which will pay tribute to healthcare workers and first responders in a variety of ways – including raising funds for the work being done to combat the impact of COVID-19. Funds will help support six national nonprofits and their respective COVID-19 relief efforts.

“We recognize the challenging times we are living in but we are looking forward to presenting the 2020 NFL Draft and providing some hope for football fans everywhere,” Seth Markman, ESPN vice president, production told USA Today and the Hartford Courtant. “For the past couple of years, ESPN’s NFL and college teams have worked together on our draft coverage, and it has been a win for our viewers. This year, we are further excited to collaborate with the NFL Network creating an All Star broadcast. We are also committed to producing the ESPN/NFL Network and ABC shows in the safest possible environment for our announcers and production teams.”

“We are excited to partner with ESPN to present a unique and collaborative broadcast of the 2020 NFL Draft,” said Mark Quenzel, Senior Vice President of Programming and Production, NFL Network. “By bringing the exceptional on-air talent and production staffs of both ESPN and NFL Network together, we hope to deliver a unified presentation of the draft that not only helps raise awareness and funds for the COVID-19 relief efforts but also provides entertainment that millions of sports fans have been craving.”

NFL Draft Schedule (April 23-25, all times Eastern):

Thursday April 23 (8 – 11:30 p.m.): NFL Draft, Round 1 on ABC, ESPN, NFL Network, ESPN Deportes, ESPN Radio
Friday, April 24 (7 – 11:30 p.m.): NFL Draft, Rounds 2 and 3 on ABC, ESPN, NFL Network, ESPN Deportes, ESPN Radio
Saturday, April 25 (Noon – 7 p.m.): NFL Draft, Rounds 4 through 7 on ABC, ESPN, NFL Network, ESPN Deportes, ESPN Radio

ESPN and NFL Network: Trey Wingo will host all three days of ESPN’s NFL Draft coverage for the fourth consecutive year, based in Bristol. Wingo will be joined remotely by ESPN analysts Mel Kiper Jr. (37th draft), Louis Riddick (sixth) and Booger McFarland (third). NFL Network host Rich Eisen (17th), Draft analyst Daniel Jeremiah (eighth) and Pro Football Hall of Famers Michael Irvin (Ninth) and Kurt Warner (10th) will also contribute remotely all three days. ESPN NFL host Suzy Kolber will conduct remote interviews with NFL draftees from an ESPN studio and ESPN Senior NFL Insiders Chris Mortensen and Adam Schefter will again be part of the three-day telecast, providing updates from their respective homes.

ABC: Hosts Rece Davis, Jesse Palmer and Maria Taylor will lead ABC’s unique prime-time presentation of the NFL Draft on April 23rd and 24th. Featuring NFL Draft analyst Todd McShay (12th draft, first commentating on all seven rounds) and college football analysts Kirk Herbstreit (third), Desmond Howard (third), David Pollack (third), and correspondent/feature reporter Tom Rinaldi, ABC will focus on storytelling and the journey draft prospects and their families have taken to get to the NFL. Davis, Palmer, Taylor and Rinaldi will be in-studio in Bristol.

McShay will join Wingo and the ESPN/NFL Network crew for Rounds 4 through 7 on Saturday, April 25.

ESPN reporters will cover the NFL Draft remotely for ABC, ESPN and NFL Network. Assignments include:

Josina Anderson (covering Minnesota, Washington, Cleveland and San Francisco)
Jeff Darlington (Miami, Jacksonville, Tampa Bay and Kansas City)
Dan Graziano (Green Bay, Detroit, Los Angeles Chargers, Carolina and Las Vegas)
Sal Paolantonio (New York Giants, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York Jets)
Mike Reiss (New England)
Dianna Russini (ATLANTA, Tennessee, Cincinnati and New Orleans)
Ed Werder (Denver, Seattle, Dallas and Arizona)

Digital: The 2020 NFL Draft will also be streamed live via a number of NFL and ESPN digital properties across devices (Phone, PC, tablet and connected TVs). NFL Network or ESPN authentication may be required.

NFL Digital Platforms

NFL App
NFL.com
ESPN Digital Platforms

ESPN App
ESPN.com

ESPN Deportes: ESPN Deportes will also provide exclusive Spanish-language coverage of the 2020 NFL Draft. Commentators include Monday Night Football voices Eduardo Varela and Pablo Viruega. In addition, ESPNDeportes.com will have a team dedicated to covering the draft, providing pre-draft analysis, pieces written by Sebastian Martinez Christensen and videos of every selection.

Radio/Audio: Radio coverage of the 2020 NFL Draft will be provided by SiriusXM, Westwood One and ESPN Radio. Digital audio coverage of the 2020 NFL Draft will be available via the TuneIn app.

Following is the 2020 NFL Draft first round order.

2020 FIRST ROUND DRAFT ORDER

# Team (W-L-T, Pct.; Opp W-L-T, Strength of Schedule)
1. Cincinnati (2-14-0, .125; 141-114-1, .553)
2. Washington (3-13-0, .188; 128-127-1, .502)
3. Detroit (3-12-1, .219; 129-126-1, .506)
4. New York Giants (4-12-0, .250; 120-134-2, .473)
5. Miami (5-11-0, .313; 124-132-0, .484)
6. Los Angeles Chargers (5-11-0, .313; 131-124-1, .514)
7. Carolina (5-11-0, .313; 140-115-1, .549)
8. Arizona (5-10-1, .344; 135-120-1, .529)
9. Jacksonville (6-10-0, .375; 124-132-0, .484)
10. Cleveland (6-10-0, .375; 136-119-1, .533)
11. New York Jets (7-9-0, .438; 121-135-0, .473)
12. Las Vegas (7-9-0, .438; 123-132-1, .482)
13. Indianapolis (7-9-0, .438; 126-130-0, .492)
14. Tampa Bay (7-9-0, .438; 127-127-2, .500)
15. Denver (7-9-0, .438; 130-125-1, .510)
16. ATLANTA (7-9-0, .438; 139-116-1, .545)
17. Dallas (8-8-0, .500; 122-133-1, .479)
18. Pittsburgh (traded to Miami)(8-8-0, .500; 128-127-1, .502)
19. Chicago (traded to Las Vegas)(8-8-0, .500; 129-125-2, .508)
20. Los Angeles Rams (traded to Jacksonville)(9-7-0, .563; 136-118-2, .535)
21. Philadelphia (9-7-0, .563; 116-139-1, .455)
22. Buffalo (10-6-0, .625; 118-138-0, .461)
23. New England (12-4-0, .750; 120-136-0, .469)
24. New Orleans (13-3-0, .813; 124-131-1, .486)
25. Minnesota (10-6-0, .625; 121-133-2, .477)
26. Houston (traded to Miami)(10-6-0, .625; 133-123-0, .520)
27. Seattle (11-5-0, .688; 135-119-2, .531)
28. Baltimore (14-2-0, .875; 126-129-1, .494)
29. Tennessee (9-7-0, .563; 125-131-0, .488)
30. Green Bay (13-3-0, .813; 115-139-2, .453)
31. San Francisco (13-3-0, .813; 128-126-2, .504)
32. Kansas City (12-4-0, .750; 130-125-1, .510)

The National Football League announced the names of 99 players who have been granted special eligibility for the 2020 NFL Draft and 16 players who have fulfilled their degree requirements with college football eligibility remaining and are also eligible for selection in the April 23-25 draft in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The following 16 players have in timely fashion under NFL rules officially notified the league office that they have fulfilled their degree requirements. Consequently, they are eligible for selection:

Name, Position – College

1 Eno Benjamin, RB – Arizona State
2 Oluwole Betiku, DE – Illinois
3 Lloyd Cushenberry, C – Louisiana State
4 Quartney Davis, WR – Texas A&M
5 Alohi Gilman, DB – Notre Dame
6 Matt Hennessy, C – Temple
7 Darnay Holmes, DB – UCLA
8 Keith Ismael, C – San Diego State
9 Jaylon Johnson, DB – Utah
10 Tony Jones, RB – Notre Dame
11 Terrell Lewis, LB – Alabama
12 Jordan Love, QB – Utah State
13 Elorm Lumor, DE – Rutgers
14 Houston Miller, DE – Texas Tech
15 Kenneth Murray, LB – Oklahoma
16 Isaiah Simmons, LB – Clemson

Each of the 99 players listed below have met the league’s three-year eligibility rule and have renounced their college football eligibility by submitting written notification to the league office on or before the January 17 deadline. Consequently, they are eligible for selection:

The players granted special eligibility for the 2020 NFL Draft:

Name, Position – College

1 Salvon Ahmed, RB – Washington
2 Cam Akers, RB – Florida State
3 Grayland Arnold, DB – Baylor
4 Devin Asiasi, TE – UCLA
5 Trajan Bandy, DB – Miami-Florida
6 Mekhi Becton, T – Louisville
7 Tyler Biadasz, C – Wisconsin
8 Ross Blacklock, DT – Texas Christian
9 Lynn Bowden, WR – Kentucky
10 Marcus Brown, DE – Missouri Western
11 Hunter Bryant, TE – Washington
12 Quintez Cephus, WR – Wisconsin
13 K’Lavon Chaisson, LB – Louisiana State
14 Saahdiq Charles, T – Louisiana State
15 Ezra Cleveland, T – Boise State
16 Nick Coe, DE – Auburn
17 Trystan Colon-Castillo, C – Missouri
18 Isaiah Coulter, WR – Rhode Island
19 Kamren Curl, DB – Arkansas
20 DeeJay Dallas, RB – Miami-Florida
21 Cameron Dantzler, DB – Mississippi State
22 Gabriel Davis, WR – Central Florida
23 Kyle Davis, WR – Florida Atlantic
24 Grant Delpit, DB – Louisiana State
25 A.J. Dillon, RB – Boston College
26 J.K. Dobbins, RB – Ohio State
27 Jacob Eason, QB – Washington
28 Clyde Edwards-Helaire, RB – Louisiana State
29 Jordan Elliott, DT – Missouri
30 A.J. Epenesa, DE – Iowa
31 Darrynton Evans, RB – Appalachian State
32 Jake Fromm, QB – Georgia
33 Jonathan Garvin, DE – Miami-Florida
34 Willie Gay, LB – Mississippi State
35 Yetur Gross-Matos, DE – Penn State
36 Pete Guerriero, RB – Monmouth-New Jersey
37 Javelin Guidry, DB – Utah
38 K.J. Hamler, WR – Penn State
39 Harrison Hand, DB – Temple
40 C.J. Henderson, DB – Florida
41 Tee Higgins, WR – Clemson
42 Isaiah Hodgins, WR – Oregon State
43 Noah Igbinoghene, DB – Auburn
44 Austin Jackson, T – Southern California
45 Trishton Jackson, WR – Syracuse
46 Justin Jefferson, WR – Louisiana State
47 Jerry Jeudy, WR – Alabama
48 Dalton Keene, TE – Virginia Tech
49 Solomon Kindley, G – Georgia
50 Cole Kmet, TE – Notre Dame
51 CeeDee Lamb, WR – Oklahoma
52 Javon Leake, RB – Maryland
53 James Lynch, DT – Baylor
54 Justin Madubuike, DT – Texas A&M
55 Cole McDonald, QB – Hawaii
56 Anthony McFarland, RB – Maryland
57 Xavier McKinney, DB – Alabama
58 Thaddeus Moss, TE – Louisiana State
59 Netane Muti, T – Fresno State
60 Tomas Newman, DB – Virginia-Lynchburg
61 Jeff Okudah,DB – Ohio State
62 Albert Okwuegbunam, TE – Missouri
63 Colby Parkinson, TE – Stanford
64 Donovan Peoples-Jones, WR – Michigan
65 Jacob Phillips, LB – Louisiana State
66 James Pierre, DB – Florida Atlantic
67 Patrick Queen, LB – Louisiana State
68 Jalen Reagor, WR – Texas Christian
69 Debione Renfro, DB – Texas A&M
70 Amik Robertson, DB – Louisiana Tech
71 Kenny Robinson, DB – West Virginia
72 Kendrick Rogers, WR – Texas A&M
73 Henry Ruggs, WR – Alabama
74 Cesar Ruiz, C – Michigan
75 Darnell Salomon, WR – South Florida
76 Stanford Samuels, DB – Florida State
77 Josiah Scott, DB – Michigan State
78 Laviska Shenault, WR – Colorado
79 Arryn Siposs, P – Auburn
80 Geno Stone, DB – Iowa
81 D’Andre Swift, RB – Georgia
82 Tua Tagovailoa, QB – Alabama
83 Jonathan Taylor, RB – Wisconsin
84 Tabyus Taylor, RB – Virginia Union
85 A.J. Terrell, DB – Clemson
86 Andrew Thomas, T – Georgia
87 Jeff Thomas, WR – Miami – Florida
88 Michael Turk, P – Arizona State
89 Michael Warren, RB – Cincinnati
90 Quez Watkins, WR – Southern Mississippi
91 Curtis Weaver, DE – Boise State
92 Cody White, WR – Michigan State
93 Jedrick Wills, T – Alabama
94 Isaiah Wilson, T – Georgia
95 Antoine Winfield, DB – Minnesota
96 Tristan Wirfs, T – Iowa
97 David Woodward, LB – Utah State
98 Chase Young, DE – Ohio State
99 Toren Young, RB – Iowa

The following players inquired about their draft status and are eligible for selection without the need for special eligibility:

Name, Position – School
1 Deshawn McClease, RB – Virginia Tech
2 Carlos Strickland, WR – Texas-San Antonio
3 J.J. Taylor, RB – Arizona
4 Ty’Son Williams, RB – Brigham Young
5 Josh Uche, LB – Michigan

The number of players granted special eligibility for the NFL Draft the past 10 years:

Year – Players Granted Special Eligibility
2020 – 99
2019 – 103
2018 – 106
2017 – 95
2016 – 96
2015 – 74
2014 – 98
2013 – 73
2012 – 65
2011 – 56

The 2019 regular season has come and gone. The 2020 season? That gets underway September 10. The National Football League announced the opponents for the upcoming 2020 season.

The opponents for all 2020 regular-season games have been determined and a complete list of each team’s home and away match-ups was issued earlier by the NFL.

The scheduling formula implemented in 2002 with realignment guarantees that all teams play each other on a regular, rotating basis.

Under the formula, every team plays 16 games as follows:
• Home and away against its three division opponents (six games).
• The four teams from another division within its conference on a rotating three-year cycle (four games).
• The four teams from a division in the other conference on a rotating four-year cycle (four games).
• Two intra-conference games based on the prior year’s standings (two games). These games match a first-place team against the first-place teams in the two same-conference divisions the team is not scheduled to play that season. The second-place, third-place and fourth-place teams in a conference are matched in the same way each year.

Beginning in 2010, a change was made to how teams are paired in the schedule rotation with the AFC and NFC West divisions. The official 2020 schedule, with playing dates and times, will be announced in the spring (PATIENCE, GRASSHOPPER!). NFL Kickoff 2020 Weekend will begin on Thursday night, September 10 and the regular season will conclude on Sunday, January 3, 2021 and the season concludes with Super Bowl LV in Tampa Bay on Sunday, February 7, 2021.

Below are the 2020 opponents with each team placed in their division by order of finish in the standings.

AFC

AFC EAST

1. New England (12-4)
Home: Buffalo, Miami, New York Jets, Arizona, Baltimore, Denver, Las Vegas, San Francisco
Away: Buffalo, Miami, New York Jets, Houston, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, Los Angeles Rams, Seattle

2. Buffalo (10-6)
Home: Miami, New England, New York Jets, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, Los Angeles Rams, Pittsburgh, Seattle
Away: Miami, New England, New York Jets, Arizona, Denver, Las Vegas, San Francisco, Tennessee

3. New York Jets (7-9)
Home: Buffalo, Miami, New England, Arizona, Cleveland, Denver, Las Vegas, San Francisco
Away: Buffalo, Miami, New England, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, Los Angeles Rams, Seattle

4. Miami (5-11)
Home: Buffalo, New England, New York Jets, Cincinnati, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, Los Angeles Rams, Seattle
Away: Buffalo, New England, New York Jets, Arizona, Denver, Jacksonville, Las Vegas, San Francisco

AFC NORTH

1. Baltimore (14-2)
Home: Cincinnati, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Dallas, Jacksonville, Kansas City, New York Giants, Tennessee
Away: Cincinnati, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Houston, Indianapolis, New England, Philadelphia, Washington

2. Pittsburgh (8-8)
Home: Baltimore, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Denver, Houston, Indianapolis, Philadelphia, Washington
Away: Baltimore, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Buffalo, Dallas, Jacksonville, New York Giants, Tennessee

3. Cleveland (6-10)
Home: Baltimore, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Philadelphia, Washington
Away: Baltimore, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Dallas, Jacksonville, New York Giants, New York Jets, Tennessee

4. Cincinnati (2-14)
Home: Baltimore, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Dallas, Jacksonville, Los Angeles Chargers, New York Giants, Tennessee
Away: Baltimore, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Houston, Indianapolis, Miami, Philadelphia, Washington

AFC SOUTH

1. Houston (10-6)
Home: Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Tennessee, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Green Bay, Minnesota, New England
Away: Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Tennessee, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Kansas City, Pittsburgh

2. Tennessee (9-7)
Home: Houston, Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Buffalo, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Pittsburgh
Away: Houston, Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Denver, Green Bay, Minnesota

3. Indianapolis (7-9)
Home: Houston, Jacksonville, Tennessee, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Green Bay, Minnesota, New York Jets
Away: Houston, Jacksonville, Tennessee, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh

4. Jacksonville (6-10)
Home: Houston, Indianapolis, Tennessee, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Miami, Pittsburgh
Away: Houston, Indianapolis, Tennessee, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Green Bay, Los Angeles Chargers, Minnesota

AFC WEST

1. Kansas City (12-4)
Home: Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles Chargers, ATLANTA, Carolina, Houston, New England, New York Jets
Away: Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles Chargers, Baltimore, Buffalo, Miami, New Orleans, Tampa Bay

2. Denver (7-9)
Home: Kansas City, Las Vegas, Los Angeles Chargers, Buffalo, Miami, New Orleans, Tampa Bay, Tennessee
Away: Kansas City, Las Vegas, Los Angeles Chargers, ATLANTA, Carolina, New England, New York Jets, Pittsburgh

3. Las Vegas (7-9)
Home: Denver, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, Buffalo, Indianapolis, Miami, New Orleans, Tampa Bay
Away: Denver, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, ATLANTA, Carolina, Cleveland, New England, New York Jets

4. Los Angeles Chargers (5-11)
Home: Denver, Kansas City, Las Vegas, ATLANTA, Carolina, Jacksonville, New England, New York Jets
Away: Denver, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Miami, New Orleans, Tampa Bay

NFC

NFC EAST

1. Philadelphia (9-7)
Home: Dallas, New York Giants, Washington, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Los Angeles Rams, New Orleans, Seattle
Away: Dallas, New York Giants, Washington, Arizona, Cleveland, Green Bay, Pittsburgh, San Francisco

2. Dallas (8-8)
Home: New York Giants, Philadelphia, Washington, Arizona, ATLANTA, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, San Francisco
Away: New York Giants, Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Los Angeles Rams, Minnesota, Seattle

3. New York Giants (4-12)
Home: Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington, Arizona, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Tampa Bay
Away: Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore, Chicago, Cincinnati, Los Angeles Rams, Seattle

4. Washington (3-13)
Home: Dallas, New York Giants, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Carolina, Cincinnati, Los Angeles Rams, Seattle
Away: Dallas, New York Giants, Philadelphia, Arizona, Cleveland, Detroit, Pittsburgh, San Francisco

NFC NORTH

1. Green Bay (13-3)
Home: Chicago, Detroit, Minnesota, ATLANTA, Carolina, Jacksonville, Philadelphia, Tennessee
Away: Chicago, Detroit, Minnesota, Houston, Indianapolis, New Orleans, San Francisco, Tampa Bay

2. Minnesota (10-6)
Home: Chicago, Detroit, Green Bay, ATLANTA, Carolina, Dallas, Jacksonville, Tennessee
Away: Chicago, Detroit, Green Bay, Houston, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Seattle, Tampa Bay

3. Chicago (8-8)
Home: Detroit, Green Bay, Minnesota, Houston, Indianapolis, New Orleans, New York Giants, Tampa Bay
Away: Detroit, Green Bay, Minnesota, ATLANTA, Carolina, Jacksonville, Los Angeles Rams, Tennessee

4. Detroit (3-12-1)
Home: Chicago, Green Bay, Minnesota, Houston, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Tampa Bay, Washington
Away: Chicago, Green Bay, Minnesota, Arizona, ATLANTA, Carolina, Jacksonville, Tennessee

NFC SOUTH

1. New Orleans (13-3)
Home: ATLANTA, Carolina, Tampa Bay, Green Bay, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, Minnesota, San Francisco
Away: ATLANTA, Carolina, Tampa Bay, Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Las Vegas, Philadelphia

2. ATLANTA (7-9)
Home: Carolina, New Orleans, Tampa Bay, Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Las Vegas, Seattle
Away: Carolina, New Orleans, Tampa Bay, Dalla, Green Bay, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, Minnesota

3. Tampa Bay (7-9)
Home: ATLANTA, Carolina, New Orleans, Green Bay, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, Los Angeles Rams, Minnesota
Away: ATLANTA, Carolina, New Orleans, Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Las Vegas, New York Giants

4. Carolina (5-11)
Home: ATLANTA, New Orleans, Tampa Bay, Arizona, Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Las Vegas
Away: ATLANTA, New Orleans, Tampa Bay, Green Bay, Kansas City, Los Angeles Chargers, Minnesota, Washington

NFC WEST

1. San Francisco (13-3)
Home: Arizona, Los Angeles Rams, Seattle, Buffalo, Green Bay, Miami, Philadelphia, Washington
Away: Arizona, Los Angeles Rams, Seattle, Dallas, New England, New Orleans, New York Giants, New York Jets

2. Seattle (11-5)
Home: Arizona, Los Angeles Rams, San Francisco, Dallas, Minnesota, New England, New York Giants, New York Jets
Away: Arizona, Los Angeles Rams, San Francisco, ATLANTA, Buffalo, Miami, Philadelphia, Washington

3. Los Angeles Rams (9-7)
Home: Arizona, San Francisco, Seattle, Chicago, Dallas, New England, New York Giants, New York Jets
Away: Arizona, San Francisco, Seattle, Buffalo, Miami, Philadelphia, Tampa Bay, Washington

4. Arizona (5-10-1)
Home: Los Angeles Rams, San Francisco, Seattle, Buffalo, Detroit, Miami, Philadelphia, Washington
Away: Los Angeles Rams, San Francisco, Seattle, Carolina, Dallas, New England, New York Giants, New York Jets

Divisional Playoff Broadcast Information (All times Eastern)

NFC: Minnesota at San Francisco, 4:35 p.m. Saturday on NBC: Al Michaels, Cris Collinsworth, Michele Tafoya (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Ryan Radtke, Tony Boselli, Scott Kaplan (field reporter); SIRIUS: 82 (Minnesota), 83 (San Francisco); XM: 226 (Minnesota), 225 (San Francisco)

AFC: Tennessee at Baltimore, 8:15 p.m. Saturday on CBS: Ian Eagle, Dan Fouts, Evan Washburn (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Brandon Gaudin, Ross Tucker, Laura Okmin (field reporter); SIRIUS: 82 (Tennessee), 83 (Baltimore); XM: 226 (Tennessee), 225 (Baltimore)

AFC: Houston at Kansas City, 3:05 p.m. Sunday on CBS: Jim Nantz, Tony Romo, Tracy Wolfson (field reporter), Jay Feely (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Kevin Kugler, Trent Green, James Laurinaitis (field reporter); SIRIUS: 82 (Houston), 83 (Kansas City); XM: 226 (Houston), 225 (Kansas City)

NFC: Seattle at Green Bay, 6:40 p.m. Sunday on FOX: Joe Buck, Troy Aikman, Erin Andrews (field reporter), Chris Myers (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Kevin Harlan, James Lofton, Hub Arkush (field reporter); SIRIUS: 82 (Seattle), 83 (Green Bay); XM: 226 (Seattle), 225 (Green Bay)

Divisional Officials
NFC: Minnesota at San Francisco, 4:35 p.m. Saturday: Walt Anderson
AFC: Tennessee at Baltimore, 8:15 p.m. Saturday: Bill Vinovich
AFC: Houston at Kansas City, 3:05 p.m. Sunday: Shawn Hochuli
NFC: Seattle at Green Bay, 6:40 p.m. Sunday: Clete Blakeman

Divisional Odds (Home team in CAPS)

Saturday’s Games
NFC: SAN FRANCISCO – 6 1/2 vs. Minnesota (45 1/2)
AFC: BALTIMORE – 9 vs. Tennessee (47)

Sunday’s Games
AFC: KANSAS CITY – 9 1/2 vs. Houston (50)
NFC: GREEN BAY – 4 vs. Seattle (46)

Saturday and Sunday Injury Report

NFC: Minnesota at San Francisco, 4:35 p.m. Saturday

Minnesota
OUT: CB Mackensie Alexander (knee), S Jayron Kearse (toe, knee)
QUESTIONABLE: WR Adam Thielen (ankle)

San Francisco
QUESTIONABLE: DE Dee Ford (quadricep, hamstring), DE Kentavius Street (knee)

AFC: Tennessee at Baltimore, 8:15 p.m. Saturday

Tennessee
OUT: LB Jayon Brown (shoulder), WR Adam Humphries (ankle)
QUESTIONABLE: WR Cody Hollister (ankle)

Baltimore
QUESTIONABLE: TE Mark Andrews (ankle), RB Mark Ingram (calf)

AFC: Houston at Kansas City, 3:05 p.m. Sunday

Houston
QUESTIONABLE: S Jahleel Addae (knee), TE Jordan Akins (hamstring), CB Keion Crossen (hamstring), TE Darren Fells (hip), WR Will Fuller (groin), CB Johnathan Joseph (hamstring), WR Kenny Stills (knee)

Kansas City
OUT: CB Morris Claiborne (not injury related, shoulder)
QUESTIONABLE: DT Chris Jones (calf), TE Travis Kelce (knee)

NFC: Seattle at Green Bay, 6:40 p.m. Sunday

Seattle
DOUBTFUL: G Mike Iupati (neck)
QUESTIONABLE: DE Ezekiel Ansah (neck), S Marquise Blair (ankle), T Duane Brown (knee), T George Fant (groin), DT Quinton Jefferson (ankle)

Green Bay
QUESTIONABLE: DT Kenny Clark (back), DT Tyler Lancaster (illness), RB Dan Vitale (knee, illness), RB Dexter Williams (illness)

Saturday and Sunday Divisonal Weather
NFC: Minnesota at San Francisco, 4:35 p.m. Saturday: Partly cloudy and 54 degrees
AFC: Tennessee at Baltimore, 8:15 p.m. Saturday: Cloudy and 64 degrees
AFC: Houston at Kansas City, 3:05 p.m. Sunday: Partly cloudy and 37 degrees
NFC: Seattle at Green Bay, 6:40 p.m. Sunday: Overcast and 22 degrees

Broadcast Information, officials and injury report courtesy the National Football League, odds courtesy Don Best, weather information courtesy The Weather Channel

Round two. The NFL playoffs march on as eight teams fight for the coveted Lombardi Trophy and now the teams that had byes will get to take the field. Baltimore, Kansas City, San Francisco and Green Bay were waiting to see who they play this weekend and now they know.

Playoff football is a lot different than a regular season game. It’s not lose and you play next week. It’s you lose and your next game is next year. Win and you advance. It’s not that hard to process. At the end of play Sunday, four teams will be left standing and the four losers will be clearing out their lockers and preparing for the 2020 NFL Draft.

The NFL’s 100th season has reached the Divisional playoffs and new teams abound. Seven of the remaining eight clubs in contention for the Lombardi Trophy at Super Bowl LIV in Miami were not in the Divisional playoffs last year. That’s the largest year-to-year turnover in the Divisional round since 1990, when the NFL instituted the current 12-team playoff format. In other words, 15 teams have been one game from advancing to the AFC or NFC Championship Game since the beginning of the 2018 playoffs.

All four clubs in the NFC – Green Bay, Minnesota, San Francisco and Seattle – are new to the NFL’s final eight. In the AFC, Baltimore, Houston and Tennessee join the group, while Kansas City represents the only club to make a second straight appearance in the Divisional playoffs.

The sixth-seeded Titans, whose 20-13 win at New England last week ensured that the NFL will have two new Super Bowl teams for the first time in four years, earned a trip to face the AFC’s top seed, Baltimore, Saturday in primetime.

Meanwhile, the NFC’s number 6 seed, Minnesota, earned a 26-20 overtime victory at New Orleans last week to advance to the Divisional round, where top-seeded San Francisco awaits in the first game on Saturday. The Number 6 seeds are now 4-0 over the past two seasons. For the first time in NFL history, all four number 6 seeds have advanced to the Divisional playoffs in consecutive years, including Indianapolis and Philadelphia in 2018.

YOUTH UNDER CENTER: The average age of the eight quarterbacks scheduled to start this weekend is 28 years, 271 days old, the youngest average age of starting quarterbacks in the Divisional playoffs since the 2010 season (28 years, 197 days).

CULTURE OF COMPETITION: Since Super Bowl LI, when New England topped Atlanta, 34-28, in the first overtime in Super Bowl history, postseason games have been fiercely competitive. Beginning with that Super Bowl, the last 27 postseason contests have been decided by just 8.1 points on average. Four of the NFL’s last seven postseason games have gone to overtime and road teams are a combined 8-6 over the last 14 NFL playoff games (excluding the neutral-field Super Bowl LIII).

GIVEAWAY-TAKEAWAY INDICATOR: Seven of the league’s eight remaining teams finished among the NFL’s top 10 in turnover margin this season. Green Bay (+12) and Seattle (+12), which tied for third in the NFL during the regular season and meet Sunday at Lambeau Field, have the best turnover margins among the remaining teams. Minnesota (+11, fifth), Baltimore (+10, sixth), Kansas City (+8, tied-seventh), Tennessee (+6, ninth) and San Francisco (+4, tied-10th) also ranked in the top 10 this season.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN DIVISIONAL WEEKEND

SURVIVE AND ADVANCE: Minnesota (11-6) and Tennessee (10-7) both earned victories on Wild Card Weekend as the number 6 seed in their respective conferences. Last season, both Indianapolis and Philadelphia advanced to the Divisional Round of the playoffs as number 6 seeds in their conferences. This marks the first time in which two number 6 seeds advanced past Wild Card Weekend in consecutive seasons since the NFL instituted the current 12-team playoff format in 1990.

Minnesota, who travels to San Francisco on Saturday and Tennessee, who travels to Baltimore on Saturday night, can become the first number 6 seeds to reach the Conference Championship since 2010.

The No. 6 seeds to reach the Conference Championship since the NFL instituted the current 12-team playoff format in 1990:

SEASON – TEAM (CONFERENCE), ADVANCED TO
2010 – Green Bay (NFC), Won Super Bowl XLV
2010 – New York Jets (AFC), AFC Championship
2008 – Baltimore (AFC), AFC Championship
2008 – Philadelphia (NFC), NFC Championship
2005 – Pittsburgh (AFC), Won Super Bowl XL
2019 – Minnesota (NFC), ??
2019 – Tennessee (AFC), ??

In the NFC, Seattle (12-5, number 5 seed), who faces Green Bay on Sunday night and the sixth-seeded Vikings are both still alive. With victories by both teams in the Divisional Playoffs, it would mark the first Conference Championship game featuring a number 5 and number 6 seed since the NFL instituted the current 12-team playoff format in 1990.

STACKING POSTSEASON VICTORIES: Green Bay (34 wins) and San Francisco (30 wins) both rank among the top five in postseason victories in league history and can add to their totals this weekend.

With a win over Seattle on Sunday, Green Bay would tie Dallas (35 wins) for the third-most postseason victories in NFL history.

The teams with the most postseason wins in NFL history:

TEAM – WINS/SUPER BOWL WINS
New England – 37/6
Pittsburgh – 36/6
Dallas – 35/5
Green Bay – 34/4
San Francisco – 30/5

GETTING IT STARTED: To kick off the Divisional Round of the NFL’s 100th season, the NFC’s top seed, San Francisco (13-3), host number 6 seed Minnesota (11-6) on Saturday. Minnesota advanced to the Divisional Round with a 26-20 overtime victory in New Orleans on Wild Card Weekend.

In his postseason debut last week, Minnesota running back DALVIN COOK finished with 130 scrimmage yards (94 rushing, 36 receiving) and two rushing touchdowns in the victory. If Cook records at least 125 scrimmage yards and two touchdowns on Saturday, he would become the first player with at least 125 scrimmage yards and two touchdowns in each of his first two career postseason games in NFL history.

RUNNING THROUGH THE POSTSEASON: The AFC’s number 1 seed, Baltimore (14-2), led the NFL with 3,296 rushing yards in the regular season, the most by a team in a single season in NFL history. Tennessee (10-7) ranked third in the league with 2,223 rushing yards in 2019, led by the NFL’s leading rusher Derrick Henry, who rushed for 1,540 yards this season.

This marks the fourth time the team with the top rushing offense met the team with the league’s leading rusher in the postseason in the Super Bowl era. In each of the matchups, the team with the league’s leading rusher has won.

Postseason matchups between the league’s top rushing offense and leading rusher in the Super Bowl era:

ROUND – TOP RUSHING OFFENSE (RUSHING YARDS); NFL LEADING RUSHER – TEAM (RUSHING YARDS)
2018 NFC Wild Card – Seattle (73); Ezekiel Elliot – Dallas (137)
Super Bowl XXVII – Buffalo (108); Emmitt Smith – Dallas (108)(HOF)
1978 AFC Divisional – New England (83); Earl Campbell – Houston Oilers (118)(HOF)
2019 AFC Divisional – Baltimore (??); Derrick Henry – Tennessee (??)

On Wild Card Weekend, Henry rushed for 182 yards and a touchdown in Tennessee’s 20-13 victory over New England. With at least 150 rushing yards on Saturday, Henry would join Pro Football Hall of Famers Marcus Allen (three games), Terrell Davis(two) and Franco Harris (two), as well as Le’Veon Bell (two) as the only players to rush for at least 150 yards in consecutive postseason games in NFL history.

Henry has rushed for 366 yards in his first three career postseason games. With at least 134 rushing yards on Saturday, Henry would become the third player to rush for at least 500 yards in their first four career postseason games in NFL history.

The players with the most rushing yards in their first four career postseason games in NFL history:

PLAYER, TEAM (RUSHING YARDS)

Terrell Davis, Denver (515)(HOF)
Arian Foster, Houston (515)
Fred Taylor, Jacksonville (493)
John Riggins, Washington (474)(HOF)
Eric Dickerson, Los Angeles Rams (470)(HOF)
Derrick Henry, Tennessee (366)*
*In 3 games

NEW ERA OF QBs: Sunday afternoon’s game featuring Houston quarterback Deshaun Watson (24 years, 120 days old) and Kansas City quarterback Patrick Mahomes (24 years, 117 days old) marks the third matchup in the Divisional Round between two quarterbacks under the age of 25 in the Super Bowl era.

Divisional Round matchups between starting quarterbacks under the age of 25 in the Super Bowl era:

SEASON – HOME TEAM/QUARTERBACK; VISITOR/QUARTERBACK (RESULT)
1985 – Miami/Dan Marino; Cleveland/ Bernie Kozar (Miami 24, Cleveland 21)(HOF)
2000 – Minnesota/Daunte Culpepper; New Orleans/Aaron Brooks (Minnesota 34, New Orleans 16)
2019 – Kansas City/Patrick Mahomes; Houston/Deshaun Watson (??)

In a 22-19 overtime victory over Buffalo on Wild Card Weekend, Watson completed 20 of 25 pass attempts (80 percent) for 247 yards and a touchdown and added 55 yards and a touchdown on the ground.

If Watson, who rushed for 76 yards on Wild Card Weekend in 2018, rushes for at least 50 yards on Sunday against Kansas City, he would become the first quarterback with at least 50 rushing yards in three consecutive postseason games in NFL history.

NIGHT CAP: In the final game of the Divisional Round, Green Bay (13-3) hosts Seattle (12-5), who defeated Philadelphia, 17-9, on Wild Card Weekend.

Seahawks rookie wide receiver D.K. Metcalf led Seattle with 160 receiving yards and a touchdown in the win, the most receiving yards by a rookie in a single postseason game in the Super Bowl era.

With at least 83 receiving yards against Green Bay on Sunday (6:40 PM ET, FOX), Metcalf would surpass TORRY HOLT (242 yards in 1999) for the most postseason receiving yards by a rookie in NFL history.

The rookies with the most postseason receiving yards in NFL history:

PLAYER, TEAM (SEASON) – REC. YARDS
Torry Holt, St. Louis Rams (1999) – 242
Austin Collie, Indianapolis (2009) – 241
DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia (2008) – 207
Steve Junker, Detroit (1957) – 201
Ricky Nattiel, Denver (1987) – 171
D.K. Metcalf, Seattle (2019) – 160*
*Entering Sunday

Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch recorded his 10th career postseason rushing touchdown in the win on Wild Card Weekend.

With at least two rushing touchdowns on Sunday, Lynch would tie Pro Football Hall of Famers Terrell Davis (12) and John Riggins (12) for the fourth-most career postseason rushing touchdowns in NFL history.

The players with the most career postseason rushing touchdowns in NFL history:

PLAYER, TEAM (RUSHING TOUCHDOWNS)
Emmitt Smith, Dallas (19)(HOF)
Franco Harris, Pittsburgh (16)(HOF)
Thurman Thomas, Buffalo (16)(HOF)
Terrell Davis, Denver (12)(HOF)
John Riggins, Washington (12)(HOF)
Marshawn Lynch, Seattle (10)*
*Entering Sunday

Green Bay quarterback Aaron Rodgers enters Sunday’s contest having thrown at least two touchdown passes in each of his past five postseason games.

With four touchdown passes against Seattle, Rodgers would tie Peyton Manning (40) for the fourth-most career postseason touchdown passes in NFL history.

The players with the most career postseason touchdown passes in NFL history:

PLAYER – TEAMS (TOUCHDOWN PASSES)
Tom Brady – New England (73)
Joe Montana – San Francisco and Kansas City (45)(HOF)
Brett Favre – Green Bay and Minnesota (44)(HOF)
Peyton Manning – Indianapolis and Denver (40)
Aaron Rodgers – Green Bay (36)*
*Entering Sunday
(HOF) – Hall of Fame

As was the case last week and will be throughout the playoffs, every game is “DRILL WORTHY!” (For those of you that know what The Drill is, you are excused. Everyone else, pay attention. We don’t want any rookie mistakes here, k?) After you go to the 9:30 mass on Sunday (the 4:30 vigil mass on Saturday counts as a mass attended, people! Don’t make us send the nuns after you! If we do, it is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OVER!), head to your favorite store (a trip to Wal Mart, Target, K-Mart or Costco counts) and get the vittles and the beverages (soda, beer, wine, coffee, et al… if you live in a state that allows the purchase of the items in question) and invite the co-workers, the neighbors (including that really cute kindergarden teacher that knows what to do with a cover-2 defense) and your cousin Connie (remember her? She’s the one that’s been married twice that’s just turned 59 last June and dates a 43-year old ex-Marine, who’s now the vice principal at the high school in your town. She’s also the one that ate an entire Oreo cheesecake, two bags of Cool Ranch Doritos, two bacon cheeseburgers with blue cheese and chugged two 2-liter Cokes at your Super Bowl party last year and didn’t gain a pound. You look at her and say to yourself, “what the hell?”)

It was not good to be a home team in the first round as Houston was the only home team to prevail in the first round. New England, New Orleans and Philadelphia were all bounced out of the first round by their guests. As for last week, we went 2-2 and for the season, 143-117.

Having said that… here are this weekend’s Divisional Picks.

Minnesota (10-6, 2nd Wild Card) at San Francisco (13-3, NFC West champion), 4:35 p.m. Saturday on NBC. Divisional Weekend gets underway in Wine Country as the top-seeded San Francisco 49ers host Kirk Cousins and the Minnesota Vikings at Levis’ Stadium.

Once again, Minnesota broke the hearts of New Orleans Saints fans Sunday afternoon in the Big Easy, leaving the Mercedes-Benz Superdome 26-20 overtime winners in the first NFC Wild Card game of the day. Minnesota erased a 10-3 deficit in the second quarter, using a 21-yard field goal by Dan Bailey and a 5-yard run by Delvin Cook with 23 seconds left before intermission to lead 13-10. Cook would add a second rushing TD, this one from a yard out to lead 20-10 with 3:23 left in the third before the Saints’ Tysom Hill connected on a 20-yard TD pass from Drew Brees to pull to within seven with 10:31. The teams then exchanged punts and turnovers and New Orleans would get the ball back with 1:55 left in the contest and got themselves inside Minnesota’s 30-yard line at the 26. The drive there would stall after New Orleans was flagged for a false start with 21 seconds left in the contest. The penalty also had a 10-second runoff, putting the game clock at 11 seconds. Brees’ pass to Alvin Kamara went incomplete and New Orleans would settle for the tie, with K Wil Lutz making up for an earlier miss, connecting on a 49-yard field goal with seven seconds left.

That would be the last time that the Saints would see the ball, as they kicked off to Minnesota, who knelt the ball down to send the contest into overtime. Minnesota, who picked up their first playoff road win since 2005, would then win the toss to start the overtime and the Vikings made sure that Brees and the Saints did not take the field, going on a 9-play, 75-yard drive that used 4:20 of time off the game clock, ending with Cousins and TE Kyle Rudolph connecting on a 4-yard TD toss to end the contest. Cook led all rushers with 96 yards and the two TDs (Hill led New Orleans with 50 yards) as the Vikings out-rushed the Saints 136-97 and Cousins threw for 242 yards and the game-winning TD without an interception (he was sacked twice), while Brees threw for 208 yards with the Hill TD (Brees was sacked three times, sacked once and had a fumble). Minnesota was 10 of 18 on third down in the Big Easy and the Vikings ruled the clock, keeping the ball for 36:56, including the 4:20 of overtime, while New Orleans, losing their second playoff game at home in a row, went 4 of 11 on third down (neither club had a fourth down try) and kept the ball for 27:24.

The number one-seeded 4ers held off a late Seattle rally in the final seconds in the land of Grunge, Salmon and Starbucks, coming away 26-21 winners at Century Link Field two weeks ago, in a contest that gave the 49ers the NFC West title, a first-round bye and revenge for their week 10 overtime loss in Santa Clara.

Seattle trailed 13-0 at the break as the 49ers scored their first half points unchallenged before the home team would break San Francsico’s bid for a shutout when Wilson and WR Tyler Lockett connected on a 14-yard TD toss late in the third quarter. San Francisco made it a 19-7 contest when RB Raheem Mostert scored from 2 yards away but the 49ers would miss the two-point conversion with 3:25 left in the quarter. Newly re-accquired RB Marshawn Lynch then pulled his team to within five with 9:55 left in the contest when he scored on a 1-yard run. Mostert pushed the 49ers lead back up to 12 with 5:51 left when he scored on a 13-yard run before Seattle stormed back again, trailing by only 5 with 3:36 left when Wilson and WR DK Metcalf connected on a 14-yard scoring pass.

Seattle would get the ball back with 2:27 left after a 49ers punt and made their way downfield, getting as close as San Francsico’s 1-yard line when Wilson tried to spike the ball to stop the clock. The Seahawks, out of time outs, were then flaggled for a delay of game penalty and passes to Lockett and Josh Hollister fell incomplete. With 12 seconds left, Wilson and Hollister would connect on a 4-yard pass but Hollister did not cross the goal line, as 49ers LB Dre Greenlaw tackled Hollister at the one-foot line. Replay would confirm that Hollister did not break the plane, which meant that Seattle did not score. San Francisco would then run out the clock and take the win in the Pacific Northwest.

San Francisco out-rushed Seattle 128-125 and Mostert led all rushers with 57 yards and the two TDs, while Seattle was led by RB Travis Homer with 62 yards (Lynch had 34 yards on 12 carries with the TD). Wilson threw for 233 yards with a pair of TDs and a sack, while Jimmy Garoppolo threw for 285 yards with a pair of sacks (neither qb threw an interception). Seattle was 8 of 14 on third down (the Seahawks were 1 of 3 on fourth down) and were rulers of the clock, keeping the ball for 32:56, while the 49ers held on to the pigskin for 27:04, going 4 of 8 on third down.

The 49ers and Vikings have met five times in post-season play and San Francisco has won four of them, with San Francisco’s last win coming in the 1997 Divisonal Playoff at Candlestick Park by a final of 38-22, while Minnesota’s lone win came in 1987 (also at Candlestick and also in the Divisional Playoff) by a final of 36-24.

The oddsmakers like the 49ers as 6 1/2-point favorites in wine country and the over/under is 45 1/2. For the 49ers, a win Saturday night means that they’ll play one more game in wine country; for the Vikings, a win would mean they would either travel to Green Bay or Seattle. The wine is really good and so are the 49ers. San Francisco’s rested and they take this one in Santa Clara, covering the 6 1/2.

Tennessee (9-7, 2nd Wild Card) at Baltimore (14-2, AFC North champion), 8:15 p.m. Saturday on CBS. Number six seed Tenneesse travels to Charm City to face off against top-seed Baltimore at M&T Bank Stadium. The Titans are coming off a huge road win against Tom Brady and the New England Patriots. As for the Ravens, they had the week off to rest and prepare.

Five Heisman Trophy winners will be at M&T Bank Stadium for Saturday night’s game in Baltimore, the most ever for a game in the Super Bowl era.

Some will play a bigger part than others in the divisional-round game. The visiting Titans have Heisman winners in backup quarterback Marcus Mariota (Oregon, 2014) and star running back Derrick Henry (Alabama, 2015). The Ravens have soon-to-be-named league MVP Lamar Jackson (Louisville, 2016), running back Mark Ingram (Alabama, 2009) and backup quarterback Robert Griffin III (Baylor, 2011).

The Titans suprised the football world last Saturday night in Foxboro as they went into Gillette Stadium and came away 20-13 winners over Brady and the Patriots. Tennessee erased a 13-7 Patriot lead late in the first half on a 1-yard run by Derreck Henry with 35 seconds left in the half and would take that lead into the third quarter (the two teams were scoreless in that period) and sealed New England’s fate late in the contest when Logan Ryan picked off Brady with nine seconds left in the contest and ran the ball back nine yard for a TD.

Henry ran for 182 yards on 34 carries with the TD as the Titans out-rushed New England 201-98 (New England was led by Sony Michel with 61 yards) and Ryan Tannehill threw for 72 yards and a TD toss to TE Anthony Firkser, while Brady threw for 209 yards with the late-game interception (Tannehill was sacked once, Brady was not sacked). Tennessee was 6 of 12 on third down and kept the ball for 31:09, while the Patriots, who led only once in the contest on a 5-yard run by WR Julian Edleman and a Nick Folk field goal in the second quarter, was 5 of 13 on third down (0 of 1 on fourth down) and kept the ball for 28:51.

The Ravens come off their bye week after they took care of Pittsburgh 28-10 at M&T Bank Stadium to close out the 2019 regular season. Baltimore, leading from start to finish in a contest that saw the Ravens leave some of their starters on the bench, led 16-7 at the intermission. Pittsburgh’s Chris Boswell would connect on a 26-yard field goal to make it a 6-point contest before the Ravens would score 12 fourth-quarter points to seal the Steelers’ fate.

Ravens RB Gus Edwards led all rushers with 130 yards as the Ravens out-rushed Pittsburgh 223-91 and Robert Griffin III threw for 96 yards and an interception, taking over for Lamar Jackson, while Steelers’ QB Delvin Hodges threw for 95 yards with no TDs or interceptions and a pair of sacks, including one for a safety late in the contest. Baltimore was 7 of 16 on third down (they were 1 of 2 on fourth down) and ruled the clock, as they kept the ball for 39:27, while the Steelers kept the pigskin for 20:33, while going 5 of 12 on third down, 0 of 1 on fourth down.

In three post-season meetings, the Ravens lead the series 2-1 and have outscored Tennessee 54-40. Baltimore’s last playoff win came in 2008, when they left Nissan Stadium 13-10 winners in the AFC Divisional Playoff, while the Titans’ lone win came in 2003 in Charm City by a final of 20-17 in the AFC Wild Card Game. The boys and girls in Vegas like the Ravens as 9 1/2-point favorites in Charm City and the over/under’s 48. We think they got it right. For the Titans, it was fun while it lasted. For the Ravens, they’re moving on. It’ll be closer than the 9 1/2 but Baltimore prevails in Charm City.

Houston (10-6, AFC South champion) at Kansas City (12-4, AFC West champion), 3:05 p.m. Sunday on CBS. Sunday afternoon Divisonal action gets underway in the Show-Me State as Patrick Mahomes and the Kansas City Chiefs host DeShaun Watson and the Houston Texans at Arrowhead Stadium in a late-afternoon affair. While the Chiefs enjoyed their bye week, Houston needed overtime at home to take the win to advance to the next round.

Houston rallied from being down 13-0, scoring 16 second-half points unchallenged before coming away 22-19 overtime winners over Buffalo at NRG Stadium last Saturday afternoon. The Bills got a 16-yard TD from WR John Brown to QB Josh Allen and three Stephen Hauschka field goals before Watson dented the scoreboard, scoring on a 20-yard TD run and a 2-point conversion with 93 seconds left in the third quarter. Kai Fairbairn would then pull the Texans to within five on a 41-yard field goal early in the fourth quarter and Houston would take the lead on a 5-yard TD pass from Watson to Carlos Hyde for a 3-point lead with 4:37 left in regulation.

Buffalo would not go away quietly as they would an 11-play, 41-yard drive, using 71 seconds of clock and proceeded to tie the contest with 5 seconds left in regulation as Hauschka connected on a 47-yard field to send the contest into overtime. Houston would get the ball to start the overtime but went three and out, punting the ball to Buffalo. The Bills got the ball at their 30-yard line and would eventually cross the 50-yard line before Bills OT Cody Ford was flagged for a blindside block. That moved the ball back to their 43-yard line, where Buffalo’s drive stalled and the Bills punted the ball back to the Texans.

Houston, knowing that a score on the next possession would win the game, took advantange and used a 9-play, 73-yard drive that took 5:42 of clock and ended as Fairbairn sent Texans fans home happy with a 28-yard field goal with 3:20 left in the extra period. Buffalo out-rushed Houston 172-141 and Allen led all rushers with 92 yards, while Watson led Houston with 55 yards and the rushing TD. Allen would throw for 264 yards and was sacked three times, while Watson threw for 247 yards with the TD to Hyde but was sacked seven times (neither QB threw an interception). Houston was 6 of 13 on third down and kept the ball for 36:25, while the Bills, holding the ball for 35:15, went 11 of 21 on third down (both teams were 0 of 1 on fourth down).

The Chiefs secured the number two-seed at home as they took care of the Los Angeles Chargers 31-21 at Arrowhead Stadium. Kansas City led 10-7 at the break, then watched as the Chargers took the lead from them with 13:14 left in the third when RB Melvin Gordon scored on a 5-yard run. That lead would last all of 16 seconds as Chiefs WR Mecole Hardman ran the ensuing kickoff back 104 yards untouched for a TD to give Kansas City the lead back and for good. After Chargers TE Hunter Henry caught an 8-yard TD pass from Philip Rivers, Damien Williams would score the second of his two TDs in the second half (the first good for 84 yards), icing the game away with a 7-yard run to seal the win and the first-round bye.

Williams led all rushers with 124 yards as Kansas City out-rushed Los Angeles 162-108 and Mahomes threw for 174 yards and a TD to DeMarcus Robinson (Mahomes threw an interception but was not sacked), while Rivers threw for 281 with a pair of TDs and a pair of interceptions (Rivers was sacked three times). Both clubs did well on third down tries (the Chief were 7 of 10, Los Angeles was 8 of 13) and the Chargers actually were rulers of the clock, keeping the ball for 36:04 (they went 2 of 4 on fourth down), while the Chiefs held on to the pigskin for 23:56.

They met in week six in the regular season in week six at Arrowhead and the Texans would score 20 second-quarter points unchallenged, then held off a late Chiefs rally to come away 31-24 winners. The Chiefs trailed 23-17 at the intermission before they would rally to take the lead back with 6:30 left in the third when Mahomes and WR Tyreek Hill would connect on a 6-yard TD pass to lead 24-23. Kansas City carried that 1-point lead into the fourth when Watson would take matters into his own feet, scoring his second TD of the day on a 1-yard run and then connecting with Derick Hopkins for the two-point conversion. The Chiefs would get the ball back but would go three and out and after a Chiefs’ punt, the Texans would run out the clock and take the win in the Show-Me State.

Hyde led all rushers with 116 yards and a TD as the Texans out-rushed Kansas City 192-53 with Watson (two interceptions) throwing for 280 yards and a TD to Derek Johnson, while Mahomes (sack, interception) threw for 273 yards and three TDs (two to Hill). Houston was 5 of 12 on third down (the Texans were 2 of 3 on fourth down) and ruled the clock, keeping the ball for 39:48, while the Chiefs held on to the pigskin for 20:12, while going 4 of 8 on third down.

They’ve met once in post-season play and Kansas City would come away 30-0 winners at NRG Stadium in the AFC Playoff game. In that contest, the Chiefs would score all of their points unchallenged, taking a 13-0 lead with them to the intermission and never looking back. Kansas City’s Knile Davis would open the scoring on a 106-yard kickoff return and from there, the floodgates opened for Houston and they could never get themselves on track. Kansas City out-rushed Houston 141-114 (Houston’s Alfred Blue led all rushers with 99 yards) and Alex Smith threw for 190 yards and a TD, while Brian Hoyer threw for 136 yards (both Smith and Hoyer were sacked three times, Hoyer was picked off four times, while Smith was picked off once). The Chiefs were 4 of 11 on third down and Kansas City ruled the clock, holding on to the ball for 34:25, while the Texans, keeping the ball for 25:35, went 6 of 14 on third down, 0 for 1 on fourth down.

Kansas City in the week six contest was favored by 4 1/2 and the Texans covered, winning by 7 and both teams matched the 55 over/under. In the divisional round, the Chiefs are favored by 9 1/2 at Arrowhead and the over/under’s 50. The winner plays for the Hunt Trophy next week, while the loser will be second-guessing themselves for the entire offseason. While things will be closer than 9 1/2, Houston’s hopes of a Lombardi Trophy will have to wait at least another year. Everything’s up to date in Kansas City as the Chiefs prevail at Arrowhead but expect this one to be closer than 9 1/2.

Seattle (11-5, 1st Wild Card) at Green Bay (13-3, NFC North champion), 6:40 p.m. Sunday on FOX. A pair of Super Bowl QBs (Russell Wilson and Aaron Rodgers) meet in the land of cheese, beer and Bratwurst as Green Bay hosts Seattle at Lambeau Field in the final game of Divisional Weekend. The Packers enter the contest with a bye under their belts, while Seattle made a cross-country trip to take on the Eagles in the City of Brotherly Love last Sunday evening.

Seattle held Philadelphia to three Josh Elliott field goals, then held off two late Eagle scoring attempts and left Lincoln Financial Field 17-9 winners last Sunday afternoon. The Seahawks broke a 3-3 tie with 66 seconds left before intermission when RB Marshawn Lynch scored on a 5-yard run, taking the lead back for good. Seattle would add a 53-yard TD pass from Wilson to D.K. Metcalf with 8:46 left in the third to all but seal the game away, holding Philadelphia to an Elliott field goal with 2:49 left in the quarter. Seattle would hold off two late Eagles rallies in the fourth, the first ending on an incomplete pass from backup QB Josh McCown with 6:24 left to play and the second when McCown was sacked at Seattle’s 11-yard line with 2 minutes left to play.

Seattle was out-rushed by Philadelphia 120-64 with Eagles RB Miles Sanders leading all rushers with 69 yards on 14 carries (Wilson led Seattle with 45 yards) and Wilson threw for 325 yards with the TD to Metcalf (Wilson was sacked once), while McCown, who took over for Carson Wentz (head injury) threw for 174 yards with six sacks (neither Wilson, Wentz or McCown had an interception). Seattle went 8 of 15 on third down tries and kept the ball for 26:45, while the Eagles actually ruled the clock, keeping the ball for 33:15, while going 3 of 11 on third down, 0 of 2 on fourth down.

The Packers, the number two-seed in the playoffs, erased a 17-3 haltimore deficit at Detroit and stormed their way back to a 23-20 last-second win against the Lions at Ford Field two weeks ago. Green Bay trailed their NFC North rivals at the intermisson, then proceeded to outscore the Lions 20-3 in the final 30 minutes play and sent Lions fans home with their seventh loss in a row when Packers K Mason Crosby booted a 33-yard field goal as time expired.

The Packers tied the contest up with 5:19 left in regulation when Rodgers and WR Allen Lazard hooked up on a 28-yard TD toss. Then after the teams exchanged the ball on punts, Green Bay would get the ball back with 80 seconds left in the contest and used all of that time left to go on an 8-play, 68-yard drive that would end with Crosby’s game-winning kick. While Detroit actually out-rushed Green Bay 171-120, Jones led all rushers with Aaron Jones leading all rushers with 100 yards on the ground. Rodgers threw for 323 yards with the TD to Lazard, while Detroit’s David Blough threw for 122 yards and caught a TD pass from WR Danny Amendola (both men were sacked once and threw an interception). Green Bay was 8 of 20 on third down in the Motor City (they were perfect on fourth down, going 2 of 2) and including the final 80 seconds of the contest, ruled the clock and kept the pigskin for 34:56, while the Lions were 3 of 12 on third down, 1 of 1 on fourth down.

Seattle and Green Bay have met three times in the post-season and the Packers lead the series 2-1. Green Bay has outscored the Seahawks 97-75 in the three meetings and Green Bay’s last win in the post-season came in 2007 at Lambeau in the Divsional playoff by a final of 42-20, while Seattle’s last win came in 2014 in the land of Grunge, Salmon and Starbucks, coming away 28-22 overtime winners. Green Bay’s favored by 4 at Lambeau and the over/under’s 46. For the Packers… a win means that they could be going to Santa Clara for a rematch should San Francisco win or a home game against the Vikings if somehow Minnesota were to prevail. For Seattle… a win would mean a rematch with either the 49ers or Vikings. It’ll be a rematch one way or the other but in the end, Green Bay prevails. Packers cover the 4 and win in Lambeau.

Wild Card Broadcast Information (All times listed Eastern)

Buffalo (10-6, 1st Wild Card) at Houston (10-6, AFC South champion), 4:35 p.m. Saturday on ESPN, with simulcast on ABC: Joe Tessitore, Booger McFarland, Lisa Salters (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Tom McCarthy, Rod Woodson, Hub Arkush (field reporter); SIRIUS: 82 (Buffalo), 83 (Houston); XM: 226 (Buffalo), 225 (Houston)

Tennessee (9-7, 2nd Wild Card) at New England (12-4, AFC East champion), 8:15 p.m. Saturday on CBS: Jim Nantz, Tony Romo, Tracy Wolfson (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Mike Tirico, Tony Boselli, Laura Okmin (field reporter); SIRIUS: 82 (Tennessee), 83 (New England); XM: 226 (Tennessee), 225 (New England)

Minnesota (10-6, 2nd Wild Card) at New Orleans (13-3, NFC South champion), 1:05 p.m. Sunday on FOX: Joe Buck, Troy Aikman, Erin Andrews (field reporter), Chris Myers (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Kevin Kugler, Jason Taylor, Scott Kaplan (field reporter); SIRIUS: 226 (Min), 225 (New Orleans); XM: 226 (Min), 225 (New Orleans)

Seattle (11-5, 1st Wild Card) at Philadelphia (9-7, NFC East champion), 4:40 p.m. Sunday on NBC: Al Michaels, Cris Collinsworth, Michele Tafoya (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Kevin Harlan, Ross Tucker; SIRIUS: 82 (Seattle), 83 (Philadelphia); XM: 226 (Seattle), 225 (Philadelphia)

Wild Card Officials
Buffalo at Houston, 4:35 p.m. Saturday: Tony Corrente
Tennessee at New England, 8:15 p.m. Saturday: John Hussey
Minnesota at New Orleans, 1:05 p.m. Sunday: Carl Cheffers
Seattle at Philadelphia, 4:40 p.m. Sunday: Shawn Smith

Wild Card Odds (Home teams in CAPS)

Saturday
HOUSTON – 3 vs. Buffalo (42 1/2)
NEW ENGLAND – 4 1/2 vs. Tennessee (43 1/2)

Sunday
NEW ORLEANS – 8 vs. Minnesota (48)
Seattle – 1 1/2 at PHILADELPHIA (46)

Wild Card Saturday and Sunday Injury Report

Buffalo at Houston, 4:35 p.m. Saturday

Buffalo
QUESTIONABLE: DE Shaq Lawson (Hamstring), T Attauyo Nsekhe (Ankle), WR Andre Roberts (Foot), CB Levi Wallace (Ankle)

Houston
QUESTIONABLE: S Jahleel Addae (Achilles), TE Jordan Akins (Hamstring), WR William Fuller (Groin), CB Jonathan Joseph (Hamstring), CB Bradley Roby (Hamstring)

Tennessee at New England, 8:15 p.m. Saturday

Tennessee
Out: WR Adam Humphries (Ankle)
QUESTIONABLE: S Dane Cruikshank (Illness), WR Cody Hollister (Ankle), WR Kalif Raymond (Concussion)

New England
QUESTIONABLE: LB Ja’Whaun Bentley (Knee), S Terrence Brooks (Groin), LB Jamie Collins (Shoulder), WR Julian Edelman (Knee), CB Jonathan Jones (Groin), CB Jason McCourty (Groin)

Minnesota at New Orleans, 1:05 p.m. Sunday

Minnesota

OUT: CB Mackensie Alexander (Knee), CB Michael Hughes (Neck)
QUESTIONABLE: DE Ifeadikachakwu Odenigbo (Hamstring)

New Orleans
OUT: CB Eli Apple (Ankle), RB Zach Line (Knee)

Seattle
OUT: LB Marvin Kendricks (Knee), WR Malik Turner (Concussion)
QUESTIONABLE: WR Jaron Brown (Knee), G Mike Iupati (Neck)

Philadelphia
OUT: WR Nelson Agholor (Knee)
QUESTIONABLE: TE Zach Ertz (Ribs), T Lane Johnson (Ankle)

Wild Card Saturday and Sunday Weather
Buffalo at Houston, 4:35 p.m. Saturday: Game indoors
Tennessee at New England, 8:15 p.m. Saturday: Overcast with a 40 percent chance of showers and 42 degrees
Minnesota at New Orleans, 1:05 p.m. Sunday: Game indoors
Seattle at Philadelphia, 4:40 p.m. Sunday: Mostly sunny and 42 degrees

Broadcast Information, officials and injury report courtesy the National Football League, odds courtesy Don Best, weather information courtesy The Weather Channel

Black Monday has come and gone. Teams not in the post-season have made changes in the front office and coaching staffs and are preparing for the 2020 NFL Draft. 20 teams are at home, clearing out lockers, getting ready for next season, their dreams of holding the Lombardi Trophy shattered because of injuries, bad decisions on and sometime off the field damaging those hopes. 256 games in the regular season have been played. The regular season is over and in the books and the second season begins this Saturday.

For the 12 teams that are left standing, either as champions of their divisions or winners of that coveted Wild Card spot, it’s their second season. It’s a chance to hit the reset button and extend their season, even if it means by one game. There’s a SMALL plot twist in all of this.

You win this week, you’re playing next week.

You lose…. you’re clearing out your locker and your next game is September of 2020.

The NFL’s 100th season has reached the playoffs and the playoff field is as strong as it’s ever been. Six playoff teams – Baltimore (14-2), Kansas City (12-4) and New England (12-4) from the AFC and San Francisco (13-3), Green Bay (13-3) and New Orleans (13-3) from the NFC – won at least 12 regular-season games, tied for the most such teams in a single postseason in NFL history.

The seasons with the most playoff teams that won 12-or-more regular-season games:

SEASON – TEAMS
2019 – 6
2011 – 6
2003 – 6
Many – 5

The combined winning percentage (.708, 136-56) of this season’s field is the highest in 14 years, since it was .719 (138-54) in 2005.

The playoffs continue with the Divisional round on January 11-12, the Conference Championship Games on January 19 and Super Bowl LIV on February 2 at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami on FOX at 6:30 p.m. Eastern.

It’s football’s version of the children’s game of “Musicial Chairs.” As long as there’s a chair and the music is playing, everyone has a chance. It’s when the music stops and everyone scrambles for a chair that there’s chaos. One by one you take a chair out and start over until there’s a winner. It’s finality but it makes the NFL worth watching, even if your team is not in the mix.

New teams making the playoffs, terrific turnarounds, consistent teams excelling again, records falling and young players making their mark. The 2019 season had it all.

Youth and success at the quarterback position highlighted the 2019 regular season as 208 games featured at least one starting quarterback under the age of 27, the most in a single season in NFL history. In total, quarterbacks under the age of 27 started 287 games and recorded 144 wins in those starts this season, both the highest single-season totals since 1970. Three quarterbacks under the age of 25 – Baltimore’s Lamar Jackson (2018 NFL Draft), Kansas City’s Patrick Mahomes (2017 NFL Draft) and Houston’s DeShaun Watson (2017 NFL Draft) – have led their respective teams to division titles in each of the past two seasons.

Competitiveness was a constant theme throughout the regular season as 68 percent of games (174 of 256) were within one score (eight points) in the fourth quarter, tied for the fifth-most such games in a single season in NFL history, while 52.3 percent of games (134 of 256) were decided by eight-or-fewer points, also tied for the fifth-most such games in single season in league annals. Additionally, 57 games saw a team come back to win or tie after trailing in the fourth quarter.

Week 17 came down to the wire, as two playoff spots and two divisions titles – the NFC East and NFC West – were decided on the final day of the season. Sunday’s excitement was due in part to having 16 divisional games played on the season’s final day, a tradition instituted in 2010.

Five of the 12 playoff teams are new to the postseason in 2019: Buffalo, Green Bay, Minnesota, San Francisco and Tennessee and since 1990 – a streak of 30 consecutive seasons – at least four teams have qualified for the playoffs in every season that were not in the postseason the year before. Both Green Bay (NFC North) and San Francisco (NFC West) won their division after missing the postseason in 2018 and at least two teams have won their divisions the season after missing the playoffs in 16 of the past 17 years.

Teams to win their division a season after missing the postseason since 2003:

SEASON – NEW DIVISION WINNERS AFTER MISSING POSTSEASON THE PREVIOUS SEASON
2019 – Green Bay, San Francisco
2018 – Baltimore, Chicago*, Dallas, Houston*
2017 – Jacksonville*, Los Angeles Rams, New Orleans, Minnesota, Philadelphia*
2016 – ATLANTA, Dallas*
2015 – Houston, Minnesota, Washington*
2014 – Dallas, Pittsburgh
2013 – Carolina*, Philadelphia*
2012 – Washington*
2011 – Denver*, Houston*, New York Giants, San Francisco
2010 – ATLANTA, Chicago, Kansas City*, Pittsburgh, Seattle
2009 – Cincinnati, Dallas, New England, New Orleans*
2008 – Arizona, Carolina, Miami*, Minnesota
2007 – Green Bay, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay*
2006 – Baltimore*, New Orleans*, Philadelphia*, San Diego
2005 – Chicago*, Cincinnati, New York Giants, Tampa Bay*
2004 – ATLANTA*, Pittsburgh, San Diego*
2003 – Baltimore, Carolina*, Kansas City*, New England, St. Louis Rams
*Worst to first

OFFENSIVE TRENDS: The 2019 season will go down as one of the most prolific offensive seasons in league history.

Teams combined to score 1,332 total touchdowns, the third-most in a single season in NFL history, while the 11,680 total points were tied for the third-most in league annals.

MOST TOUCHDOWNS, NFL HISTORY

SEASON – TOUCHDOWNS
2018 – 1,371
2013 – 1,338
2019 – 1,332
2015 – 1,318

MOST TOTAL POINTS, NFL HISTORY

SEASON – TOTAL POINTS
2013 – 11,985
2018 – 11,952
2019 – 11,680
2015 – 11,680

With five teams – Baltimore (33.2 points per game), San Francisco (29.9), New Orleans (28.6), Tampa Bay (28.6) and Kansas City (28.2) – averaging at least 28 points per game, the 2019 season joined 2014 (six teams) as the only seasons with at least five teams averaging at least 28 points per game since 1970.

The Ravens, who scored at least 40 points in five different games this season, led the NFL with 3,296 rushing yards and surpassed the 1978 New England Patriots (3,165) for the most rushing yards by a team in a single season in NFL history.

PROLIFIC PASSERS: In 2019, league-wide passing numbers continued to trend at a historic pace, as the marks for passer rating (90.4 – second), completion percentage (63.5 percent – second), total completions (11,331 – fourth) and touchdown passes (797 – fifth) were all ranked in the top five for highest in a single season in NFL history.

SEASON – RATING
2018 – 92.9
2019 – 90.4
2015 – 90.2
2016 – 89.3
2014 – 88.9

SEASON – COMPLETION PCT.
2018 – 64.9
2019 – 63.5
2016 – 63.0
2015 – 63.0
2014 – 62.6

SEASON – COMPLETIONS
2015 – 11,527
2016 – 11,526
2018 – 11,462
2019 – 11,331
2014 – 11,200

SEASON – TD PASSES
2018 – 847
2015 – 842
2014 – 807
2013 – 804
2019 – 797

Eleven quarterbacks passed for at least 4,000 yards in 2019, including four with at least 4,500 passing yards: Tampa Bay’s Jameis Winston (5,109), Dallas’ Dak Prescott (4,902), the Los Angeles Rams’ Jared Goff (4,638) and the Los Angeles Chargers’ Philip Rivers (4,615).

Twelve quarterbacks threw at least 25 touchdown passes this season, including four with at least 30 touchdown passes: Baltimore’s LAMAR JACKSON (36), Winston (33), Seattle’s Russell Wilson (31) and Prescott (30).

Three rookie quarterbacks – New York Giants’ Daniel Jones, Jacksonville’s Gardner Minshew and Arizona’s Kyler Murray – each passed for at least 20 touchdowns this season, marking the second season in league annals in which at least three rookie quarterbacks each passed for at least 20 touchdowns (2012 – Robert Griffin III, Andrew Luck and Russell Wilson).

Nine quarterbacks had a passer rating of 100 or higher in 2019, including three with a passer rating of at least 110: Tennessee’s Ryan Tannehill (117.5), New Orleans’ Drew Brees (116.3) and Jackson (113.3). The nine quarterbacks with a passer rating of 100 or higher were tied with the 2018 season for the most in a single season in NFL history.

The seasons with the most quarterbacks having a passer rating of 100 or higher in NFL history:

SEASON – QUARTERBACKS WITH 100+ PASSER RATING
2019 – 9
2018 – 9
2013 – 7

ALL-PURPOSE BACKS: Sixteen players rushed for at least 1,000 yards, including four players with at least 1,300 rushing yards, this season: Tennessee’s Derrick Henry (1,540), Cleveland’s Nick Chubb (1,494), Carolina’s Christian McCaffrey (1,387) and Dallas’ Ezekiel Elliott (1,357).

Seven players recorded at least 10 rushing touchdowns in 2019: Henry (16), Green Bay’s Aaron Jones (16), McCaffrey (15), Minnesota’s Dalvin Cook (13), Elliott (12), the Los Angeles Rams’ Todd Gurley (12) and Baltimore’s Mark Ingram (10).

Twenty-six running backs totaled at least 1,000 scrimmage yards, including eight with at least 1,500 scrimmage yards, this season: McCaffrey (2,392), Elliott (1,777), Chubb (1,772), Henry (1,746), Jacksonville’s Leonard Fournette (1,674), Cook (1,654), Jones (1,558) and the Los Angeles Chargers’ Austin Ekeler (1,550).

Three running backs – Jones (19 scrimmage touchdowns), McCaffrey (19) and Henry (18) – each recorded at least 18 scrimmage touchdowns this season.

2019 was the third season in NFL history with three players totaling at least 18 scrimmage touchdowns each, joining 2005 (Shaun Alexander, Larry Johnson and Pro Football Hall of Famer LaDainian Tomlinson) and 1962 (Pro Football Hall of Famers Jim Brown and Jim Taylor and Abner Haynes).

RIDICULOUS RECEIVERS: Twenty-nine players had at least 1,000 receiving yards, including five with at least 1,200 receiving yards this season: New Orleans’ Michael Thomas (1,725), Atlanta’s Julio Jones (1,394), Tampa Bay’s Chris Godwin (1,333), Kansas City’s Travis Kelce (1,229) and Miami’s Devante Parker (1,202).

Five players had at least 100 receptions in 2019: Thomas (single-season NFL record 149), Carolina’s Christian McCaffrey (116), the Los Angeles Chargers’ Keenan Allen (104), Houston’s DeAndre Hopkins (104) and New England’s Julian Edleman (100).

Three players had at least 10 touchdown catches this season: Detroit’s Kenny Golladay (11), Baltimore’s Mark Andrews (10) and the Los Angeles Rams’ Cooper Kupp (10).

Five rookies recorded at least seven touchdown receptions in 2019: Tennessee’s A.J. Brown (eight), the New York Giants’ Darius Slayton (eight), Baltimore’s Marquise Brown (seven), Washington’s Terry McLaurin (seven) and Seattle’s D.K. Metcalf (seven). In total, rookies combined for 110 touchdown receptions in 2019 and surpassed 2014 (109 touchdown catches) for the most combined touchdown receptions by rookies in a single season since 1970.

DOMINANT DEFENDERS: Eighteen players recorded at least 10 sacks, including five with at least 14 sacks, in 2019: Tampa Bay’s Shaquil Barrett (19.5), Arizona’s Chandler Jones (19), New Orleans’ Cameron Jordan (15.5), Minnesota’s Danielle Hunter (14.5) and Pittsburgh’s T.J. Watt (14.5).

Five players registered at least five forced fumbles this season: Jones (eight), Watt (eight), Barrett (six), Washington’s Ryan Anderson (five) and Chicago’s Khalil Mack (five). 2019 was the first season since 2002 (Dwight Freeeney and Leonard Little) that two players had at least eight forced fumbles in the same season.

Ten players recorded at least five interceptions, including three with six interceptions, this season: New England’s Stephon Gilmore (six), Minnesota’s Anthony Harris (six) and Buffalo’s Tre’Davious White (six).

SEVEN FROM SUNDAY IN WEEK 17: Five of the 12 teams to qualify for the playoffs are new to the postseason in 2019, having missed the playoffs a year ago: Buffalo, Green Bay, Minnesota, San Francisco and Tennessee.

Since 1990 – a streak of 30 consecutive seasons – at least four teams have qualified for the playoffs in every season that were not in the postseason the year before.

Baltimore won the AFC North and finished as the AFC’s number 1 seed and the Ravens will have home-field advantage through the AFC playoffs. Kansas City won the AFC West, are the number 2 seed and the Chiefs clinched a first-round bye in the AFC playoffs. New England won the AFC East. The Patriots are the number 3 seed and will host number 6 seed Tennessee in the Wild Card round. The Titans clinched a playoff berth for the second time in the past three seasons. Houston won the AFC South, are the number 4 seed and the Texans will host number 5 seed Buffalo in the Wild Card round. The Bills clinched a playoff berth for the second time in the past three seasons.

San Francisco defeated Seattle and became the number 1 seed and have home-field advantage throughout the NFC playoffs. Green Bay won the NFC North and clinched the numbere 2 seed and a bye in the first round of the NFC playoffs. New Orleans won the NFC South and became the number 3 seed in the post-season tournament. They will face number 6 seed Minnesota in New Orleans. Philadelphia won the NFC East for the second time in the past three seasons, are the number 4 seed and the Eagles will host either Seattle in the NFC Wild Card round.

Three rookie quarterbacks – New York Giants’ Daniel Jones, Jacksonville’s Gardner Minshew and Arizona’s Kyler Murray – each passed for at least 20 touchdowns this season, marking the second season in league annals in which at least three rookie quarterbacks each passed for at least 20 touchdowns (2012 – Robert Griffin III, Andrew Luck and Russell Wilson).

Jones led all rookie quarterbacks with 24 touchdown passes in 2019, the fourth-most by a rookie quarterback in a single season in NFL history. Only Baker Mayfield (27 in 2018), Peyton Manning (26 in 1998) and Russell Wilson (26 in 2012) had more.

Murray passed for 3,722 yards and rushed for 544 yards this season and joined Cam Newton (2011) as the only rookies with at least 3,500 passing yards and 500 rushing yards in NFL history.

New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees passed for 253 yards and three touchdowns with zero interceptions for a 123.3 rating in the Saints’ 42-10 win at Carolina. Brees has 93 career games with at least three touchdown passes, tied with Peyton Manning (93) for the most in NFL history. Brees recorded his fourth consecutive game with at least three touchdown passes and zero interceptions and joined Russell Wilson (five games in 2015), Tom Brady (four in 2007) and Aaron Rodgers (four in 2014) as the only players with at least four consecutive games of at least three touchdown passes and zero interceptions in a single season in league annals.

In 2019, Brees recorded a 74.3 completion percentage (281 of 378), the second-highest single-season completion percentage in NFL history, trailing only the mark he set in 2018 (74.4 percent).

Carolina running back Christian McCAaffery recorded seven receptions and 98 scrimmage yards (72 receiving, 26 rushing) with a rushing touchdown on Sunday. McCaffrey led the NFL with 2,392 scrimmage yards this season, the third-most scrimmage yards in a single season in NFL history, trailing only Chris Johnson (2,509 in 2009) and Pro Football Hall of Famer Marshall Faulk (2,429 in 1999).

McCaffrey totaled 1,387 rushing yards and 1,005 receiving yards in 2019 and joined Roger Craig (1985) and Pro Football Hall of Famer Marshall Faulk (1999) as the only players with at least 1,000 rushing yards and 1,000 receiving yards in a single season in league annals. McCaffrey has 303 receptions since entering the NFL in 2017 and joined Michael Thomas (321 receptions) as the only players with at least 300 receptions in their first three seasons in NFL history.

Tennessee rookie wide receiver A.J. Brown had a 51-yard touchdown reception in the Titans’ Week 17 win. Brown has four touchdown catches of at least 50 yards in 2019 and joined Isaac Curtis (five in 1973), Willie Gault (four in 1983) and Pro Football Hall of Famer Randy Moss (five in 1998) as rookies with at least four touchdown receptions of 50-or-more yards since 1970.

Kansas City rookie wide receiver Mecole Hardman recorded a 104-yard kickoff return for a touchdown in the Chiefs’ Week 17 win. Hardman, who also had an 83-yard touchdown reception in 2019, is the fourth player and first rookie in NFL history with a kick return touchdown of at least 100 yards and touchdown reception of at least 80 yards in the same season in NFL history.

Detroit rookie quarterback David Blough, New England linebacker Elandon Roberts and Atlanta tackle Ty Sambrailo each recorded touchdown receptions in Week 17. Blough, who caught a 19-yard touchdown pass against Green Bay, joined Marcus Mariota (December 13, 2015) as the only rookie quarterbacks to register a touchdown reception since 1970.

Roberts caught a 38-yard touchdown pass against Miami, the longest touchdown reception by a linebacker since 1970.

Sambrailo recorded a 35-yard touchdown reception against Tampa Bay, the longest touchdown reception by an offensive lineman since 1970.

Other notable performances from Sunday include:

Batlimore led the NFL with 3,296 rushing yards in 2019 and surpassed the 1978 New England Patriots (3,165) for the most rushing yards by a team in a single season in NFL history.

New England quarterback Tom Brady passed for two touchdowns with one interception in Week 17 against Miami. Brady has 541 career touchdown passes and surpassed Peyton Manning (539) for the second-most touchdown passes in NFL history. Only Drew Brees (547) has more.

Tampa Bay quarterback Jameis Winston led the NFL with 5,109 passing yards in 2019 and became the eighth different quarterback to throw for at least 5,000 yards in a single season in league annals.

Denver running back Phillip Lindsay had 1,011 rushing yards in 2019 and became the first undrafted player to rush for at least 1,000 yards in each of his first two seasons since 1967.

Atlanta linebacker Deion Jones registered a game-winning 27-yard interception return for a touchdown on the first play of overtime in the Falcons’ 28-22 win at Tampa Bay. Jones is the seventh player with a game-winning interception return for a touchdown in overtime since 2002 and the first since Robert Alford (October 11, 2015).

Buccaneers rookie linebacker Devin White recorded a 91-yard fumble return for a touchdown in Week 17. White, who also had a 14-yard fumble return for a touchdown in Week 13, is the first rookie to return two opponent fumble recoveries for a touchdown in a single season since 1970.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN WILD CARD WEEKEND

NEW YEAR, NEW TEAMS: This season, five teams qualified for the playoffs after missing the postseason in 2018 – Buffalo, Green Bay, Minnesota, San Francisco and Tennessee – three of which will be active on Wild Card Weekend (Buffalo at Houston, Saturday at 4:35 p.m. on ESPN/ABC; Tennessee at New England, Saturday at 8:15 p.m. on CBS and Minnesota at New Orleans, Sunday at 1:05 p.m. on FOX).

Since the 12-team playoff format was adopted in 1990 – a streak of 30 consecutive seasons – at least four teams have qualified for the playoffs in every season that were not in the postseason the year before.

POSTSEASON DEBUTS: Three quarterbacks – Buffalo’s JOSH ALLEN, Philadelphia’s Carson Wentz and Tennessee’s Ryan Tannehill – are expected to make their first-career postseason starts on Wild Card Weekend.

The players with the most passing yards in their first-career postseason start:

PLAYER, TEAM (SEASON – ROUND, PASSING YARDS)
Kelly Holcomb, Cleveland (2002 – AFC Wild Card, 429)
Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay (2009 – NFC Wild Card, 423)
Randall Cunningham, Philadelphia (1988 – NFC Divisional, 407)
Kurt Warner, St. Louis Rams (1999 – NFC Divisional, 391) (HOF)
Neil Lomax, St. Louis Cardinals (1982 – NFC Wild Card – 385)

YOUNG QUARTERBACKS KICK OFF WILD CARD WEEKEND: Saturday afternoon’s game featuring Buffalo quarterback Josh Allen (23 years, 228 days old) and Houston quarterback DeShaun Watson (24 years, 112 days old) marks the sixth postseason matchup between two quarterbacks under the age of 25 in the Super Bowl era.

In four of the five such matchups in the Super Bowl era, the quarterback of the home team has won.

Postseason matchups between starting quarterbacks under the age of 25 in the Super Bowl era:

SEASON – ROUND (HOME TEAM, QUARTERBACK; VISITOR, QUARTERBACK)(RESULT)
1985 – AFC Divisional (Miami, Dan Marino; Cleveland, Bernie Kozar)(Miami 24, Cleveland 21)(HOF)
2000 – NFC Wild Card (Philadelphia, Donovan McNabb; Tampa Bay, Shaun King)(Philadelphia 21, Tampa Bay 3)
2000 – NFC Divisional (Minnesota, Daunte Culpepper; New Orleans, Aaron Brooks)(Minnesota 34, New Orleans 16)
2011 – AFC Wild Card (Houston, T.J. Yates; Cincinnati, Andy Dalton)(Houston 31, Cincinnati 10)
2012 – NFC Wild Card (Washington, Robert Griffin III; Seattle, Russell Wilson)(Seattle 24, Washington 14)

CLASH OF THE TITANS: Saturday night’s matchup between Tennessee (9-7) and AFC East Champion New England (12-4) pairs the league’s top-rated quarterback Ryan Tannehill (117.5 passer rating) and the league’s leading rusher Derrick Henry (1,540 rushing yards), against a Patriots defense that led the NFL in total defense (275.9 yards per game) and scoring defense (14.1 points against per game) in 2019.

Tennessee is the fourth team since 1970 to have the league’s top-rated quarterback and league-leading rusher in the same season.

New England is the first team to allow an average of 15 or fewer points per game since the 2013 Seattle Seahawks (14.4). Seattle would go on to win Super Bowl XLVIII. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, who has led New England to 11 consecutive division titles and six overall Super Bowl championships, is the postseason’s all-time leader in games played (40), passing yards (11,179) and touchdown passes (73).

New England running back Sony Michel led the NFL with six rushing touchdowns in the 2018 postseason – tied for the second-most in a single postseason in league history. If Michel, who had at least one rushing touchdown in each of his first three career postseason games, has a rushing touchdown against Tennessee, he would join Pro Football Hall of Famers Terrell Davis and Curtis Martin, as well as Arian Foster, as the only players with a rushing touchdown in each of their first four career postseason games in NFL history.

New England wide receiver Julian Edelman has 115 receptions for 1,412 receiving yards in 18 career postseason games – both the second-most in NFL history. Only Pro Football Hall of Famer Jerry Rice (151 receptions, 2,245 receiving yards) has more.
In Super Bowl LIII, Edelman had 10 receptions for 141 receiving yards and was named the Super Bowl’s Most Valuable Player, marking his sixth-career postseason game with at least 100 receiving yards.

With at least 100 receiving yards against Tennessee, Edelman would surpass Pro Football Hall of Famer Michael Irvin (six games) for the second-most career postseason games with at least 100 receiving yards in NFL history.

The players with the most career postseason games with at least 100 receiving yards in NFL history:

PLAYER, TEAM (GAMES)
Jerry Rice, San Francisco (8) (HOF)
Julian Edelman, New England (6)
Michael Irvin, Dallas (6) (HOF)

EASY BREESY: New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees will make his 16th career postseason start on Sunday against Minnesota. Brees currently ranks in the top five in both postseason completion percentage and passer rating (minimum of 150 attempts) in league history.

The quarterbacks with the highest career postseason passer rating (min. 150 attempts):

QUARTERBACK (COMPLETIONS/ATTEMPTS – YARDS; TD/INTERCEPTIONS, RATING)
Bart Starr (130/213 – 1,753; 15/3, 104.8)(HOF)
Kurt Warner (307/462 – 3,952; 31/14, 102.8)(HOF)
Matt Ryan (237/351 – 2,672; 20/7, 100.8)
Drew Brees (408/615 – 4,759; 33/11, 100.0)*
Aaron Rodgers (378/595 – 4,457; 36/10, 99.4)*
*Active in 2019 playoffs

The quarterbacks with the highest career postseason completion percentage (min. 150 attempts):

QUARTERBACK (COMPLETIONS/ATTEMPTS, PCT.)
Nick Foles (143/210, 68.1)
Matt Ryan (237/351, 67.5)
Kurt Warner (307/462, 66.5)(HOF)
Drew Brees (408/615, 66.3)*
Ken Anderson (110/166, 66.3)

*Active in 2019 playoffs

Additionally, Brees has 4,759 career postseason passing yards. With at least 241 passing yards on Sunday, he would become the sixth player in NFL history with at least 5,000 career postseason passing yards, joining Tom Brady (11,179), Peyton Manning (7,339), Pro Football Hall of Famers Brett Farve (5,855) and Joe Montana (5,772), as well as Ben Roethlisberger (5,256).

BATTLE OF THE BIRDS: Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson passed for 4,110 passing yards this season and joined Peyton Manning and Cam Newton as the only players with at least 3,000 passing yards in each of their first eight seasons in NFL history. Wilson also became the first quarterback in league history to finish with a winning record in each of his first eight seasons.

Wilson has 94 career wins (including postseason) since entering the NFL in 2012, the second-most in a player’s first eight seasons in NFL history.

The quarterbacks with the most career wins, including postseason, in their first eight seasons in NFL history:

PLAYER, TEAM (SEASONS; WINS)
Tom Brady, New England (2000-07; 100)
Russell Wilson, Seattle (2012-19; 94)*
Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh (2004-11; 90)
*In eighth season

Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch has recorded at least 100 rushing yards in six of his 11 career postseason appearances. With at least 100 rushing yards against Philadelphia, Lynch would tie Pro Football Hall of Famers Terrell Davis (seven games) and Emmitt Smith (seven games) for the most career postseason games with at least 100 rushing yards in NFL history.

The players with the most career postseason games with at least 100 rushing yards in NFL history:

PLAYER – GAMES WITH 100+ RUSHING YARDS
Terrell Davis – 7 (HOF)
Emmitt Smith – 7 (HOF)
Marshawn Lynch – 6*
John Riggins – 6 (HOF)
Thurman Thomas – 6 (HOF)
(HOF)- Hall of Fame
*Entering postseason

Since this is the post-season, we’re going to make every post-season contest (including the Super Bowl) “DRILL WORTHY!” (For those of you that know what The Drill is, you are excused. Everyone else, pay attention. We don’t want any rookie mistakes here, k?) After you go to the 9:30 mass on Sunday (the 4:30 vigil mass on Saturday counts as a mass attended, people! Don’t make us send the nuns after you! If we do, it is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OVER!), head to your favorite store (a trip to Wal Mart, Target, K-Mart or Costco counts) and get the vittles and the beverages (soda, beer, wine, coffee, et al… if you live in a state that allows the purchase of the items in question) and invite the co-workers, the neighbors (including that really cute kindergarden teacher that knows what to do with a cover-2 defense) and your cousin Connie (remember her? She’s the one that’s been married twice that’s just turned 59 last June and dates a 43-year old ex-Marine, who’s now the vice principal at the high school in your town. She’s also the one that ate an entire Oreo cheesecake, two bags of Cool Ranch Doritos, two bacon cheeseburgers with blue cheese and chugged two 2-liter Cokes at your Super Bowl party last year and didn’t gain a pound. You look at her and say to yourself, “what the hell?”)

As good as things were in week 16 (12-4), we kinda slipped in week 17, going 7-9 and for the season, 141-115. Wild Card weekend gets underway in the Lone Star State as Houston welcomes the return of DL J.J. Watt as they host the Buffalo Bills and concludes in the City of Brotherly Love as Philadelphia and Seattle meet in a week 12 rematch at Lincoln Financial Field. Here are the Saturday and Sunday picks for Wild Card Weekend.

Buffalo (10-6, 1st Wild Card) at Houston (10-6, AFC South champion), 4:35 p.m. Saturday on ESPN, with simulcast on ABC. The AFC gets center stage all to themselves as a pair of 10-6 teams meet in the Lone Star State Saturday afternoon. Houston, winners of the AFC South, host the Buffalo Bills, who circled their wagons and won the 1st AFC Wild Card spot, meet at NRG Stadium. Both clubs enter the contest with home losses under their belts last Sunday.

The Bills, seeking their first playoff win since 1995, watched Sam Darnold and the New York Jets erase a 3-3 tie at the end of the third quarter in Orchard Park, taking a 13-6 loss to their AFC East rival in upstate New York. Buffalo trailed 3-0 at the intermission as Jets K Steve Ficken opened the scoring in the contest with a 30-yard field goal (the two clubs played a scoreless first quarter). The Bills’ Stephen Hauschka would even things up in the third quarter, connecting on a 28-yard field goal with 89 seconds left in the third. The J-E-T-S! JETS! JETS! JETS! would reclaim the lead for keeps early in the fourth quarter as Darnold and WR Jamison Crowder connected on a 1-yard TD toss. Ficken would boost GangGreen’s lead to 10 with 2:05 left before Hauscka connected on a 29-yard field goal with 47 seconds left in the contest. Buffalo then went for the onside kick, which the J-E-T-S! JETS! JETS! JETS! would recover and the vistors would run the clock out to take the win.

Neither club would breach the 100-yard barrier in upstate New York but the J-E-T-S! JETS! JETS! JETS! would out-rush Buffalo 86-73 with LeVeon Bell leading the way with 41 yards in the contest. Darnold threw for 199 yards with the TD in the third quarter (he was sacked twice and threw an interception), while Josh Allen threw for 5 yards before backup QB Matt Barkley took over, throwing for 232 yards with a sack and a pair of interceptions. Buffalo went 4 of 14 on third down and kept the ball for 28:39, while GangGreen ruled the clock, keeping the ball for 31:21, while going 5 of 14 on third down.

Houston found themselves on the short end of a 35-14 loss against Tennessee in the Lone Star State. The Titans, needing to win to get into the post-season party, broke a 7-7 after the first quarter and proceeded take a 14-7 lead into the intermission on a 1-yard TD toss from Ryan Tannehill to TE MyCole Pruitt with 9:42 left in the half. Titans RB Derrick Henry would give Tennesee a 2-TD lead early in the third on the first of his three TDs in the contest before Texans backup QB A.J. McCarron (taking over over DeShaun Watson) scored from a yard out with 69 seconds left in the quarter to narrow the gap to seven. Henry was not finished, as he would score on a 1-yard run early in the final 15 minutes of play, then put a dagger in the hearts of Texans fans, as he would run 53 yards untouched for his final TD of the afternoon.

Henry led all rushers with 211 yards and the three TDs as Tennessee out-rushed Houston 245-109 with Tannehill throwing for 198 yards with a pair of TDs, no sacks or interceptions, while McCarron threw for 225 yards with four sacks and an interception. Tennessee went 5 of 10 on third down tries and they held the ball for 28:21, while the Texans actually were rulers of the clock, keeping the ball for 31:39, while going 3 of 12 on third down, 2 of 4 on fourth down.

This is the first playoff meeting between the two teams in the history of the franchises and for the Bills, it’s their second trip in the last three seasons, while the Texans will be making their fourth consecutive trip to the post-season party. Houston is favored by 3 with a 42 1/2 over/under. For the Bills, they would like to at least move on to the next round; for the Texans, they have the same goal. The winner advances… the loser is done. Texans cover the 3 at home in the Lone Star State and advance to the Divisional Round.

Tennessee (9-7, 2nd Wild Card) at New England (12-4, AFC East champion), 8:15 p.m. Saturday on CBS. Saturday Wild Card action concludes in Foxboro as Tom Brady and the defending Super Bowl champions host the Tenneseee Titans at Gillette Stadium. The Titans look to knock off the champs in their building, while the Patriots look to right their ship from last week against Miami.

Breaking a 7-7 tie at the end of the first quarter, Tennesse floored the gas in Houston and came away 35-14 winners in the Lone Star State. The Titans, needing to win to get into the post-season party, broke a 7-7 after the first quarter and proceeded take a 14-7 lead into the intermission on a 1-yard TD toss from Ryan Tannehill to TE MyCole Pruitt with 9:42 left in the half. Titans RB Derrick Henry would give Tennesee a 2-TD lead early in the third on the first of his three TDs in the contest before Texans backup QB A.J. McCarron (taking over over DeShaun Watson) scored from a yard out with 69 seconds left in the quarter to narrow the gap to seven. Henry was not finished, as he would score on a 1-yard run early in the final 15 minutes of play, then put a dagger in the hearts of Texans fans, as he would run 53 yards untouched for his final TD of the afternoon.

Henry led all rushers with 211 yards and the three TDs as Tennessee out-rushed Houston 245-109 with Tannehill throwing for 198 yards with a pair of TDs, no sacks or interceptions, while McCarron threw for 225 yards with four sacks and an interception. Tennessee went 5 of 10 on third down tries and they held the ball for 28:21, while the Texans actually were rulers of the clock, keeping the ball for 31:39, while going 3 of 12 on third down, 2 of 4 on fourth down.

New England lost their chance to have a first-round bye as AFC East rival left Foxboro and Gillette Stadium 27-24 winners in the season finale. The Patriots trailed 17-10 at the intermission before tying things up with 4:26 left in the third when Brady and LB Elandon Roberts connected on a 38-yard TD pass. Miami reclaimed the lead with 8:29 left in the contest on a 32-yard field goal by Jason Sanders to lead by 3 before New England took the lead back, as Brady and RB James White connected on a 13-yard TD pass with 3:53 left in regulation. Miami would respond and reclaim the lead on a 5-yard TD pass from Ryan Fitzpatrick to WR Mike Gesicki with 24 seconds left. New England got the ball on their 25-yard line with the 24 seconds left and got as close as their 37-yard line with 2 seconds left when they tried several lateral passes in hope of either scoring a TD or getting a defensive penalty. Neither of those two things came to pass as Miami would hold off their efforts.

New England did manage to out-rush Miami 135-63 with Patriots RB Sony Michel leading the way with 74 yards and a TD; Brady threw for 221 yards and the two TDs (Brady was picked off once and sacked once), while Fitzpatrick threw for 320 yards with a rushing TD of his own in addition to the Gesicki TD (he was sacked twice but did not throw an interception). New England was 3 of 9 on third down tries and kept the ball for 26:09, while Miami was 5 of 12 on third down, 0 of 1 on fourth down and ruled the clock, keeping the ball for 33:51.

The Titans/Patriots game is the sixth playoff meeting in the history of the NFL where an opposing coach has played for another coach (Titans coach Mike Vrabel played for Bellicheck from 2001 to 2008). They’ve met in the post-season three times and the Patriots lead the series 2-1 and including games that were played in Houston and at Fenway Park, the Patriots have outscored Tennessee 66-59. Their last post-season meeting took place in 2017 in Foxboro and the Patriots came away with the 35-14 win in the Divisonal round, while Tennessee’s lone win in post-season came in 1978, when the team was known as the Oilers and they left Foxboro 31-14 (also in the Divisional round) winners. New England’s favored by 4 1/2 and the over/under’s 43 1/2. Tennessee would like nothing more than to knock off New England in their back yard. The Patriots? They have other plans and look to right their ship from the loss in the season finale at home. New England may not cover the 4 1/2 but the Pats get their ducks in a row and move on to the next round.

Minnesota (10-6, 2nd Wild Card) at New Orleans (13-3, NFC South champion), 1:05 p.m. Sunday on FOX. It’s the NFC’s turn to have the stage as Minnesota and New Orleans meet in the NFC’s Wild Card round in the Big Easy. The Saints, the number 3 seed in the post-season, take on the 6th-seeded Vikings, with Minnesota coming off a loss at home to Chicago, while the Saints manhandled Carolina in the Tar Heel State in their regular-season finales.

The Vikings dropped a 21-1 decision to NFC North rival Chicago at US Bank Stadium last Sunday. Minnesota trailed 11-6 at the intermission, then took a 19-18 lead with 4:53 left in the contest on a 34-yard field goal by Dan Bailey before Chicago reclaimed the lead for good with 10 seconds left on a 22-yard field goal by Eddie Pinerio.

Minnesota out-rushed Da Bears 174-158 with Viking RB Mike Boone leading all rushers with 148 yards, while Chicago was led by David Montgomery with 113 yards (both men had a rushing TD in the contest). Sean Mannion, taking over for Kirk Cousins (rest) threw for 126 yards with a pair of interceptions, while Mitchell Trubisky threw for 207 yards and was sacked four times (neither threw a TD pass). Minnesota went 4 of 9 on third down tries in the Twin Cities and held on to the ball for 22:20, while Da Bears kept the pigskin in hibernation for 37:40, going 7 of 16 on third down, 1 of 2 on fourth down.

The Saints gave Carolina their eighth loss in a row in Charlotte, coming out of the Tar Heel State 42-10 winners at Bank of America Stadium. Saints running back Alvin Kamara (39 rushing yards) opened the scoring with a pair of first-quarter TDs as the Saints would go on to lead 35-3 at the break. New Orleans out-rushed Carolina 115-41 as Drew Brees threw for 253 yards and three TDs without a sack or interception (he would be replaced by Teddy Bridgewater), while Kyle Allen threw for 295 yards with a sack and an interception. The Saints were 4 of 11 on third down and held on to the pigskin for 35:40, while the Panthers, keeping the pigskin for 24:20, went 5 of 16 on third down, 1 of 2 on fourth down.

In post-season play, the Vikings lead the series 3-1 and Minnesota has outscored the Saints 135-81. New Orleans’ lone win in the post-season series came in the Big Easy in 2009 as the Saints needed overtime to win 31-28 in the Superdome. It was their last meeting in the Twin Cities in 2017 that was a classic as the Vikings rallied to win 29-24 in the NFC Divisional playoff.

In that meeting, Minnesota and New Orleans played in a manner that not even Hollywood could have expected, with the plot line turning Minnesota’s way as the Vikings rallied to take the win over Drew Brees and the Saints at US Bank Stadium. The Vikings led 17-0 at the intermission against New Orleans before the Saints’ Michael Thomas ended Minnesota’s bid for a shutout when he and Drew Brees connected on a 14-yard TD pass with 1:18 left in the third quarter. Brees and Thomas would connect again with 13:09 left in the contest when they connected on a 3-yard toss.

After Kyle Horbath gave the Vikings a 20-14 lead with 10:12 left to play, New Orleans took the lead for the first time in the game when rookie RB Alvin Kamara caught a 14 yard TD pass from Brees with 3:01 left to. That lead would not last long, as once again it was Horbath putting the Vikings back on top with a 52-yard field goal with 89 seconds left.

New Orleans was not about to be outdone as they would use an 11-play, 50-yard drive that used 64 seconds of clock and took the lead back when K Wil Lutz connected on a 43-yard field goal with 25 seconds left. Minnesota, without time outs, engineered a drive that almost didn’t see the light of day as Case Keenum and Stefon Diggs opened with a 19-yard pass to their 39-yard line. After two Keenum passes were incomplete, the Vikings needed and got a miracle when Diggs caught Keenum’s desparation pass and took it into the end zone for a 61-yard TD pass as time expired for a walk-off TD to send Minnesota fans home happy and the Vikings to the NFC Championship Game.

Minnesota out-rushed New Orleans 95-80 and Keenum threw for 318 yards, while Brees threw for 294 (both men were sacked twice, Keenum threw an interception, while Brees threw two) and Diggs led all recievers with 137 yards on six catches, including the game-winner. Minnesota on third down was 10 of 17 and held the ball for 33:17, including the game-winning drive, while the Saints held the pigskin for 26:43, going 2 of 9 on third down and 1 of 1 on fourth down.

Minnesota in the 2017 Divisional was favored by 3 1/2 and the Vikings covered with their 5-point last-second win and the 44 1/2 over/under was taken care of, as the two clubs combined for 53 points. The Saints are favored by 8 in the Big Easy and the over/under’s 48. The winner gets to go to Green Bay next week and the Saints would like to make travel plans for next week, while the Vikings could get another shot at their NFC North rival with a win. Minnesota pulls off the upset in the Big Easy and could cover the 8.

Seattle (11-5, 1st Wild Card) at Philadelphia (9-7, NFC East champion), 4:40 p.m. Sunday on NBC. They met in the regular season. They meet again. Starbucks vs. Cheesesteak. Carson Wentz and the Eagles host Russell Wilson and Seattle in the late afternoon Wild Card game in the City of Brotherly Love.

A Seattle rally in the final seconds in the land of Grunge, Salmon and Starbucks fell short as San Francisco held off the Seahawks 26-21 at Century Link Field last Sunday night, in a contest that gave the 49ers the NFC West title and revenge for their week 10 overtime loss in Santa Clara.

Seattle, 5-0 against Philadelphia since 2010 when Pete Carroll took over, trailed 13-0 at the break as the 49ers scored their first half points unchallenged before the home team would break San Francsico’s bid for a shutout when Wilson and WR Tyler Lockett connected on a 14-yard TD toss late in the third quarter.
San Francisco made it a 19-7 contest when RB Raheem Mostert scored from 2 yards away but the 49ers would miss the two-point conversion with 3:25 left in the quarter. Newly re-accquired RB Marshawn Lynch then pulled his team to within five with 9:55 left in the contest when he scored on a 1-yard run. Mostert pushed the 49ers lead back up to 12 with 5:51 left when he scored on a 13-yard run before Seattle stormed back again, trailing by only 5 with 3:36 left when Wilson and WR DK Metcalf connected on a 14-yard scoring pass.

Seattle would get the ball back with 2:27 left after a 49ers punt and made their way downfield, getting as close as San Francsico’s 1-yard line when Wilson tried to spike the ball to stop the clock. The Seahawks, out of time outs, were then flaggled for a delay of game penalty and passes to Lockett and Josh Hollister fell incomplete. With 12 seconds left, Wilson and Hollister would connect on a 4-yard pass but Hollister did not cross the goal line, as 49ers LB Dre Greenlaw tackled Hollister at the one-foot line. Replay would confirm that Hollister did not break the plane, which meant that Seattle did not score. San Francisco would then run out the clock and take the win in the Pacific Northwest.

San Francisco out-rushed Seattle 128-125 and Mostert led all rushers with 57 yards and the two TDs, while Seattle was led by RB Travis Homer with 62 yards (Lynch had 34 yards on 12 carries with the TD). Wilson threw for 233 yards with a pair of TDs and a sack, while Jimmy Garoppolo threw for 285 yards with a pair of sacks (neither qb threw an interception). Seattle was 8 of 14 on third down (the Seahawks were 1 of 3 on fourth down) and were rulers of the clock, keeping the ball for 32:56, while the 49ers held on to the pigskin for 27:04, going 4 of 8 on third down.

The Eagles, in a need-to-win situation in the Meadowlands last Sunday, erased a 17-17 tie at the end of the third quarter, scoring 14 fourth-quarter points unchallenged to win the East against the New York Giants by a final of 34-17 at Met Life Stadium. Philadelphia led 10-3 at the half after taking that lead when Wentz and TE Josh Perkins connected on a 24-yard TD toss with 1:52 left in the half. New York would tie the contest halfway through the third quarter when WR Golden Tate and QB Daniel Jones connected on a 20-yard TD toss. Philadelphia then took the lead back on a 7-yard run with 2:21 left in the quarter but the Giants re-tied the contest on a 68-yard run by RB Sequan Barkley with 2:05 left in the quarter. Perkins would then chip in with a 50-yard run and Scott would add a pair of 2-yard runs to seal New York’s fate and take the NFC East title.

Big Blue BARELY out-rushed the Eagles 122-121 with Barkley leading all rushers with 92 yards and Scott tallying 54 for the Eagles with the three TDs. Wentz threw for 289 yards and the Perkins TD (Wentz was sacked once but did not throw an interception), while Jones tallied 301 yards with the Tate TD pass (Jones was sacked four times and threw an interception). The Eagles were 4 of 15 on third down conversions at Met Life Stadium and ruled the clock, as they held the ball for 31:25, while the Giants kept the pigskin for 28:35 (both clubs were at the 50 percent mark on fourth down; Philadelphia was 1 of 2, the Giants were 2 of 4).

While this is their first meeting in post-season play, they did meet in the City of Brotherly Love in week 12 and the Seahawks would prevail, leaving Lincoln Financial Field 17-9 winners. Seattle erased a 3-0 lead with a Wilson TD pass to WR Malik Turner, then took a 10-3 at the half on a Justin Myers field goal late in the second quarter. Seattle RB Rashaad Penny then gave his team a 10-point lead with 11:56 left in the contest on a 58-yard run before the Eagles would rally, pulling themselves to within 8 with 20 seconds left when Wentz and TE Zach Ertz connected on a TD toss. The Eagles then went for two in hopes of knocking the deficit down to six but the try failed. Philadelphia then tried an onside kick, which Seattle promptly recovered. Seattle then ran out the clock and took the win on the East Coast in the late afternoon affair.

Penny led all rushers with 129 yards and the TD as Seattle out-rushed the Eagles 174-106 (Miles Sanders led the Eagles with 63 yards) and Wilson threw for 200 yards with the Turner TD toss (he was sacked six times and threw an interception), while Wentz was good for 256 yards with the Ertz TD toss (Wentz was sacked three times and threw a pair of interceptions). Seattle was 5 of 14 on third down and kept the ball for 28:07, while the Eagles actually ruled the clock, keeping the ball for 31:53, while going 4 of 12 on third down, 0 of 1 on fourth down.

In the week 12 contest, Philadelphia was favored by 2 1/2 in the late afternoon contest in the Keystone State and Seattle would cover, winning by 8. The 49 over/under? It went untouched, as the two clubs combined for only 26 points. In the rematch, the Seahawks are a 1 1/2-point favorite in the City of Brotherly Love and the over/under’s 46. Both numbers make a lot of sense and both teams can score points if need to and this one could be a repeat of their last meeting. The only difference will be the result. The winner gets to play next weekend, while the loser gets to go home. Fly, Eagles, Fly! Like a cheesesteak with peppers, Philadelphia covers the 1 1/2 and wins in the City of Brotherly Love.

Sunday Broadcast Information (all times Eastern)

ATLANTA (6-9) at Tampa Bay (7-8), 1 p.m. on FOX and 712: Tim Brando, Matt Millen, Sara Walsh (field reporter); SIRIUS: 98 (ATLANTA), 119 (Tampa Bay); XM: 387 (ATLANTA), 232 (Tampa Bay)

New York Jets (6-9) at Buffalo (10-5), 1 p.m. on CBS and DirecTV 705: Tom McCarthy, Jay Feely; SIRIUS: 113 (New York Jets), 134 (Buffalo); XM: 383 (New York Jets), 228 (Buffalo)

Cleveland (6-9) at Cincinnati (1-14), 1 p.m. on FOX and DirecTV 708: Brandon Gaudin, Robert Smith, Megan Olivi (field reporter); SIRIUS: 211 (Cleveland), 136 (Cincinnati); XM: 385 (Cleveland), 230 (Cincinnati)

Chicago (7-8) at Minnesota (10-5), 1 p.m. on FOX and DirecTV 711: Dick Stockton, Mark Schlereth, Jennifer Hale (field reporter); SIRIUS: 133 (Chicago), 82 (Minnesota); XM: 382 (Chicago), 227 (Minnesota)

Miami (4-11) at New England (12-3), 1 p.m. on CBS and DirecTV 707: Greg Gumbel, Trent Green, Melanie Collins (field reporter); SIRIUS: 137 (Miami), 81 (New England); XM: 380 (Miami), 225 (New England)

New Orleans (12-3) at Carolina (5-10), 1 p.m. on FOX and DirecTV 709: Kenny Albert, Ronde Barber, Lindsay Czarniak (field reporter); SIRIUS: 108 (New Orleans), 135 (Carolina); XM: 384 (New Orleans), 229 (Carolina)

Green Bay (12-3) at Detroit (3-11-1), 1 p.m. on FOX and DirecTV 710: Kevin Burkhardt, Charles Davis, Pam Oliver (field reporter); SIRIUS: 138 (Green Bay), 83 (Detroit); XM: 381 (Green Bay), 226 (Detroit)

Los Angeles Chargers (5-10) at Kansas City (11-4), 4:25 p.m. on CBS and DirecTV 706: Kevin Harlan, Rich Gannon; SIRIUS: 111 (Los Angeles Chargers), 121 (Kansas City); XM: 386 (Los Angeles Chargers), 231 (Kansas City)

Philadelphia (8-7) at New York Giants (4-11), 4:25 p.m. on FOX on FOX and DirecTV 718: Thom Brennaman, Chris Spielman, Shannon Spake (field reporter); SIRIUS: 138 (Philadelphia), 83 (New York Giant); XM: 381 (Philadelphia), 226 (New York Giant)

Tennessee (8-7) at Houston (10-5), 4:25 p.m. on CBS and DirecTV 708: Jim Nantz, Tony Romo, Tracy Wolfson (field reporter); SIRIUS: 133 (Tennessee), 82 (Houston); XM: 382 (Tennessee), 227 (Houston)

Pittsburgh (8-7) at Baltimore (13-2), 4:25 p.m. on CBS and DirecTV 714: Ian Eagle, Dan Fouts, Evan Washburn (field reporter); SIRIUS: 137 (Pittsburgh), 81 (Baltimore); XM: 380 (Pittsburgh), 225 (Baltimore)

Indianapolis (7-8) at Jacksonville (5-10), 4:25 p.m. on CBS and DirecTV 709: Spero Dedes, Adam Archuleta; SIRIUS: 108 (Indianapolis), 135 (Jacksonville); XM: 384 (Indianapolis), 229 (Jacksonville)

Oakland (7-8) at Denver (6-9), 4:25 p.m. on CBS and DirecTV 713: Andrew Catalon, James Lofton; SIRIUS: 211 (Oakland), 136 (Denver); XM: 385 (Oakland), 230 (Denver)

Washington (3-12) at Dallas (7-8), 4:25 p.m. on FOX and DirecTV 717: Joe Buck, Troy Aikman, Erin Andrews (field reporter), Kristina Pink (field reporter); SIRIUS: 113 (Washington), 134 (Dallas); XM: 383 (Washington), 228 (Dallas)

Arizona (5-9-1) at Los Angeles Rams (8-7), 4:25 p.m. on FOX and DirecTV 719: Chris Myers, Daryl Johnston, Laura Okmin (field reporter); SIRIUS: 111 (Arizona), 121 (Los Angeles Rams); XM: 386 (Arizona), 231 (Los Angeles Rams)

San Francisco (11-3) at Seattle (11-4), 8:20 p.m. on NBC: Al Michaels, Cris Collinsworth, Michele Tafoya (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Kevin Kugler, Jason Taylor; SIRIUS: 81 (San Francisco), 83 (Seattle); XM: 225 (San Francisco), 226 (Seattle)

Sunday Officials
ATLANTA at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.: Carl Cheffers
New York Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.: Brad Rogers
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.: Adrian Hill
Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.: John Hussey
Miami at New England, 1 p.m.: Clay Martin
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.: Ronald Tobert
Green Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m.: Shawn Hochuli
Los Angeles Chargers at Kansas City, 4:25 p.m.: Walt Anderson
Philadelphia at New York Giants, 4:25 p.m.: Alex Kemp
Tennessee at Houston, 4:25 p.m.: Clete Blakeman
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.: Bill Vinovich
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 4:25 p.m.: Brad Allen
Oakland at Denver, 4:25 p.m.: Shawn Smith
Washington at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.: Craig Wrolstad
Arizona at Los Angeles Rams, 4:25 p.m.: Jerome Boger
San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.: Tony Corrente

Sunday Odds (Home Teams in CAPS)
TAMPA BAY – 1 1/2 vs. Atlanta (47 1/2)
BUFFALO – 1 1/2 vs. New York Jets (36)
Cleveland – 3 at CINCINNATI (44 1/2)
NEW ENGLAND – 15 1/2 vs. Miami (44 1/2)
New Orleans – 13 at CAROLINA (46)
Green Bay – 12 1/2 at DETROIT (43)
KANSAS CITY – 9 vs. Los Angeles Chargers (44 1/2)
Philadelphia – 4 1/2 at NEW YORK GIANTS (45)
HOUSTON – 3 1/2 vs. Tennessee (45 1/2)
Pittsburgh – 1 1/2 at BALTIMORE (37 1/2)
INDIANAPOLIS – 4 vs. Jacksonville (43)
DENVER – 3 1/2 vs. Oakland (41)
DALLAS – 11 vs. Washington (44 1/2)
LOS ANGELES RAMS – 7 vs. Arizona (45)
San Francisco – 3 at SEATTLE (47)

Sunday Injury Report

ATLANTA at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.

ATLANTA
OUT: G Jamon Brown (illness), DE Adrian Clayborn (knee), WR Brandon Powell (wrist)

Tampa Bay
OUT: DT Beau Allen (ankle), WR Chris Godwin (hamstring)
QUESTIONABLE: T Donovan Smith (ankle, knee), QB Jameis Winston (thumb, knee)

New York Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.

New York Jets
OUT: G Tom Compton (calf), G Alex Lewis (ankle)
QUESTIONABLE: S Jamal Adams (ankle), DE Henry Anderson (knee, shoulder), WR Robby Anderson (calf), T Kelvin Beachum (back, ankles), RB Kenneth Dixon (illness), DT Steve McLendon (knee, hip), CB Brian Poole (ankle), WR Demaryius Thomas (hamstring, knee)

Buffalo
OUT: DE Shaq Lawson (hamstring), WR Andre Roberts (foot)
QUESTIONABLE: T Ty Nsekhe (ankle)

Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.

Cleveland
QUESTIONABLE: WR Odell Beckham (groin, illness), TE Pharaoh Brown (illness), T Kendall Lamm (knee), DT Sheldon Richardson (back), TE Ricky Seals-Jones (illness), C JC Tretter (knee), DE Olivier Vernon (knee)

Cincinnati
OUT: CB William Jackson (shoulder)
DOUBTFUL: WR Stanley Morgan (concussion)

Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.

Chicago
OUT: WR Taylor Gabriel (concussion), DT Eddie Goldman (concussion), DT Akiem Hicks (elbow)
DOUBTFUL: T Rashaad Coward (knee), T Bobby Massie (ankle)
QUESTIONABLE: CB Prince Amukamara (hamstring)

Minnesota
OUT: RB Dalvin Cook (shoulder), LB Eric Kendricks (quad)
QUESTIONABLE: CB Mackensie Alexander (knee), S Jayron Kearse (foot), RB Alexander Mattison (ankle)

Miami at New England, 1 p.m.
Miami
OUT: CB Jomal Wiltz (shoulder)
QUESTIONABLE: LB Vince Biegel (elbow), DE Taco Charlton (ankle), WR Allen Hurns (ankle, neck), DT Zach Sieler (ankle, thumb), DE Christian Wilkins (ankle)

New England
QUESTIONABLE: LB Ja’Whaun Bentley (knee), S Terrence Brooks (groin), LB Shilique Calhoun (illness), T Marcus Cannon (ankle), LB Jamie Collins (shoulder), WR Julian Edelman (knee, shoulder), CB Jonathan Jones (groin), CB Jason McCourty (groin)

New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.

New Orleans
OUT: CB Eli Apple (ankle), S Vonn Bell (knee), S Marcus Williams (groin)
QUESTIONABLE: RB Zach Line (knee)

Carolina
OUT: WR D.J. Moore (concussion), LB Shaq Thompson (foot, shoulder)
QUESTIONABLE: CB Corn Elder (illness), LB Marquis Haynes (knee)

Green Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m.

Green Bay
DOUBTFUL: S Will Redmond (hamstring), RB Danny Vitale (knee), RB Jamaal Williams (shoulder)
QUESTIONABLE: WR Jake Kumerow (illness)

Detroit
OUT: DT A’Shawn Robinson (shoulder)
QUESTIONABLE: LB Devon Kennard (shoulder), LB Steve Longa (quad), K Matt Prater (illness), T Rick Wagner (knee), S Tavon Wilson (hamstring)

Los Angeles Chargers at Kansas City, 1 p.m.

Los Angeles Chargers
OUT: T Russell Okung (groin)

Kansas City
OUT: CB Morris Claiborne (should, not injury related)
QUESTIONABLE: T Cameron Erving (illness), DT Xavier Williams (ankle), G Andrew Wylie (ankle)

Philadelphia at New York Giants, 4:25 p.m.

Philadelphia
OUT: WR Nelson Agholor (knee), TE Zach Ertz (ribs, back)
QUESTIONABLE: T Lane Johnson (ankle), CB Jalen Mills (ankle)

New York Giants
OUT: TE Rhett Ellison (concussion), T Mike Remmers (concussion), TE Scott Simonson (concussion)
QUESTIONABLE: CB Corey Ballentine (back), CB Sam Beal (shoulder), LB Alec Ogletree (back)

Tennessee at Houston, 4:25 p.m.

Tennessee
OUT: WR Adam Humphries (ankle), CB Adoree’ Jackson (foot), WR Kalif Raymond (concussion)
QUESTIONABLE: WR Cody Hollister (ankle)

Houston
OUT: WR Will Fuller (groin)
QUESTIONABLE: S Jahleel Addae (achilles), WR DeAndre Hopkins (illness), LB Jake Martin (knee), CB Bradley Roby (hamstring), WR Kenny Stills (knee), T Laremy Tunsil (ankle), QB Deshaun Watson (back)

Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.

Pittsburgh
OUT: RB James Conner (quad), C Maurkice Pouncey (knee)

Baltimore
OUT: RB Mark Ingram (calf)
QUESTIONABLE: TE Mark Andrews (ankle), WR Marquise Brown (illness), CB Marcus Peters (chest), CB Jimmy Smith (groin), S Earl Thomas (knee, hand)

Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 4:25 p.m.

Indianapolis
OUT: RB Jordan Wilkins (ankle), CB Quincy Wilson (shoulder); DOUBTFUL: DT Denico Autry (concussion), S Khari Willis (shoulder)
QUESTIONABLE: CB Kenny Moore (ankle), DE Al-Quadin Muhammad (groin), G Quenton Nelson (concussion)

Jacksonville
OUT: WR Michael Walker (hamstring)
QUESTIONABLE: LB Dakota Allen (hamstring), CB A.J. Bouye (wrist), RB Leonard Fournette (neck), QB Gardner Minshew (right shoulder), TE Nick O’Leary (shoulder), WR Dede Westbrook (neck, shoulder)

Oakland at Denver, 4:25 p.m.

Oakland
DOUBTFUL: G Richie Incognito (ankle), RB Josh Jacobs (shoulder, illness)

Denver
OUT: T Ja’Wuan James (knee), G Ronald Leary (concussion), T Elijah Wilkinson (ankle)

Washington at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.

Washington
OUT: S Landon Collins (shoulder), QB Dwayne Haskins (ankle), WR Terry McLaurin (concussion)
QUESTIONABLE: S Troy Apke (knee), T Morgan Moses (knee), CB Josh Norman (illness)

Dallas
OUT: LB Joe Thomas (knee)
QUESTIONABLE: CB Byron Jones (ankle), T Tyron Smith (back), DT Antwaun Woods (hip, ankle)

Arizona at Los Angeles Rams, 4:25 p.m.

Arizona
OUT: TE Darrell Daniels (biceps)
QUESTIONABLE: TE Charles Clay (calf), QB Kyler Murray (hamstring)

Los Angeles Rams
OUT: RB Darrell Henderson (ankle), CB Jalen Ramsey (knee)
DOUBTFUL: CB Troy Hill (thumb)

San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.

San Francisco
OUT: DE Dee Ford (quadricep, hamstring), DT Jullian Taylor (elbow, knee)
DOUBTFUL: S Jaquiski Tartt (ribs)
QUESTIONABLE: G Mike Person (neck)

Seattle
OUT: T Duane Brown (knee, biceps), WR Malik Turner (concussion)
QUESTIONABLE: S Quandre Diggs (ankle), C Ethan Pocic (core)

Sunday Weather

ATLANTA at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.: Mostly cloudy and 79 degrees
New York Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.: Cloudy with a 100 percent chance of rain and 44 degrees
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.: Cloudy with an 80 percent chance of rain and 62 degrees
Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.: Game indoors
Miami at New England, 1 p.m.: Partly cloudy and 42 degrees
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.: Overcast with a 50 percent chance of rain and 67 degrees
Green Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m.: Game indoors
Los Angeles Chargers at Kansas City, 1 p.m.: Mostly cloudy and 40 degrees
Philadelphia at New York Giants, 4:25 p.m.: Overcast with a 50 percent chance of rain and 42 degrees
Tennessee at Houston, 4:25 p.m.: Game indoors
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.: Overcast with an 80 percent chance of rain and 46 degrees
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 4:25 p.m.: Overcast and 77 degrees
Oakland at Denver, 4:25 p.m.: Sunny and 34 degrees
Washington at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.: Game indoors
Arizona at Los Angeles Rams, 4:25 p.m.: Mostly sunny and 61 degrees
San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.: Partly cloudy and 45 degrees

Broadcast information, officials and injury report courtesy the National Football League, odds courtesy Don Best, weather information courtesy The Weather Channel