And then there were four.

The NFL’s version of muscial chairs continues Sunday as the last four teams standing for a chance to get another Lombardi Trophy. When things end Sunday night, there will be two teams left. Four more teams were clearing out their lockers after their losses last week.

In case you’re wondering… nothing’s changed.

Win.

Advance.

Lose.

Kickoff is in September after Labor Day.

Championship Sunday begins with the NFC Championship Game, presented by Intuit TurboTax Live, when Tampa Bay travels to Lambeau Field to play Green Bay for the George Halas Trophy at Lambeau Field. The Buccaneers are appearing in their first Championship Game since the 2002 season, when they went on to win Super Bowl XXXVII, while the Packers are making their second consecutive appearance. The game features the quarterback with the most postseason wins in NFL history, Tampa Bay’s Tom Brady (32), against the franchise with the most world championships, Green Bay (13).

In the AFC on Sunday, the top two seeds in the conference, Buffalo and Kansas City, face off at Arrowhead Stadium for the Lamar Hunt Trophy. Buffalo’s Josh Allen (24 years old) and Kansas City’s Patrick Mahomes (25) could become just the second pair of opposing quarterbacks under the age of 26 to start a conference Championship Game, joining Vince Ferragamo (25 years old) of the Los Angeles Rams and Doug Williams (24) of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the 1979 NFC title game. The Bills are playing in the AFC Championship for the first time since the 1993 season, when they defeated the Chiefs to advance to Super Bowl XXVIII. Kansas City, meanwhile, is only the second team in NFL history to host three consecutive Championship Games, joining the 2002-04 Philadelphia Eagles, who were also led by head coach Andy Reid.

WILD RIDE: For a second straight season, a Wild Card team has reached its conference Championship Game, as Tampa Bay follows in the footsteps of the 2019 Tennessee Titans. Tampa Bay is the first NFC Wild Card team to reach the Championship Game since the San Francisco 49ers in 2013, and the ninth overall Wild Card team to advance to that round since 2007. Two of those teams – the 2007 New York Giants and the 2010 Green Bay Packers – won the Super Bowl. Six teams overall, including the 1980 Oakland Raiders, 1997 Denver Broncos, 2000 Baltimore Ravens and 2005 Pittsburgh Steelers, have won the Super Bowl as Wild Card teams.

LEGENDS IN THEIR OWN LIFETIMES: Quarterbacks Tom Brady and Aaron Rodgers are meeting head-to-head for the fourth time but Sunday marks their first meeting in the postseason. Brady has won two of the previous three games, 31-17 at Gillette Stadium in 2018 with New England, and 38-10 in Week 6 earlier this season at Raymond James Stadium. Rodgers won their first meeting, a 26-21 triumph over New England at Lambeau Field in 2014.

Brady and Rodgers rank first and fourth, respectively, among the NFL’s career postseason leaders in touchdown passes.

The players with the most career touchdown passes in the postseason in NFL history:

PLAYER – TEAMS (TD PASSES)
Tom Brady – New England and Tampa Bay (77)
Joe Montana – San Francisco and Kansas City 45 (HOF)
Brett Favre – Green Bay and Minnesota (44)(HOF)
Aaron Rodgers – Green Bay (42)
Peyton Manning – Indianapolis and Denver (40)

HOPE FOR TEAMS THAT MISS PLAYOFFS: Tampa Bay advanced to their conference Championship Game the year after missing the playoffs. Last season, three teams earned berths in the Championship Game after failing to qualify for the playoffs: Green Bay, San Francisco and Tennessee. Three teams did it in 2017 (Jacksonville, Minnesota and Philadelphia) while eight overall teams since the 2016 playoffs have advanced to their conference Championship Games the year after missing the postseason. Three of the last eight teams that played in the Super Bowl – the 2019 San Francisco 49ers, 2017 Philadelphia Eagles and 2016 Atlanta Falcons – reached that pinnacle after missing the playoffs the prior season.

WEEK 6 REMATCHES: Each Championship Game contest is a rematch of a 2020 regular-season game and both contests took place in Week 6. Tampa Bay defeated Green Bay 38-10 on October 18 at Raymond James Stadium and Kansas City traveled to Buffalo to earn a 26-17 victory on October 19.

Because this is the post-season, we’re going to make both games “DRILL WORTHY!” (For those of you that know what The Drill is, you are excused. Everyone else, pay attention. We don’t want any rookie mistakes here, k?) After you go to the 9:30 mass on Sunday (the 4:30 vigil mass on Saturday counts as a Sunday mass attended, people! Don’t make us send the nuns after you! If we do, it is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OVER!), head to your favorite store (a trip to Wal Mart, Target, K-Mart or Costco counts) and get the vittles and the beverages (soda, beer, wine, coffee, et al… if you live in a state that allows the purchase of the items in question) and invite the co-workers, the neighbors (including that really cute kindergarden teacher that knows what to do with a cover-2 defense) and your cousin Connie (remember her? She’s the one that’s been married twice that’s just turned 61 last June and dates a 45-year old ex-Marine, who’s now the vice principal at the high school in your town. She’s also the one that ate an entire Oreo cheesecake, two bags of Cool Ranch Doritos, two bacon cheeseburgers with blue cheese and chugged two 2-liter Cokes at your Super Bowl party last year and didn’t gain a pound. You look at her and say to yourself, “what the hell?”)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

A FANTASTIC FINAL FOUR: On Championship Sunday, the Super Bowl LV participants will be determined. In the NFC, Tampa Bay takes on Green Bay, while Buffalo travels to Arrowhead Stadium to face Kansas City in the AFC.

Each of the remaining teams has won at least 13 regular-season and postseason games combined this season, marking the first time since 2015 that all four teams in the Conference Championship games each have at least 13 combined regular-season and postseason wins.

Additionally, each of the four teams in action this weekend averaged at least 29 points per game in the regular season, marking the first time in the Super Bowl era that all four teams in the Conference Championship games averaged at least 29 points per game. Green Bay (31.8 points per game), Buffalo (31.3) and Tampa Bay (30.8) were the three highest scoring teams in the league this season.

With victories by the Packers and Bills on Sunday, the Super Bowl would feature the two highest-scoring teams from the regular season for the fifth time since 1970 and the first time since 1997.

The Super Bowls featuring the two highest-scoring teams from the regular season since 1970:

SEASON – NO. 1 OFFENSE vs. NO. 2 OFFENSE (SUPER BOWL)
1997 – Denver vs. Green Bay (XXXII)
1996 – Green Bay vs. New England (XXXI)
1991 – Washington vs. Buffalo (XXVI)
1984 – Miami vs. San Francisco (XIX)

TOP PASSERS REMAIN: Each of the four starting quarterbacks remaining in the 2020 postseason recorded at least 35 touchdown passes this season – Green Bay’s Aaron Rodgers (48 touchdown passes), Tampa Bay’s Tom Brady (40), Kansas City’s Patrick Mahomes (38) and Buffalo’s Josh Allen (37).

This is the first time since 1970 that each of the four starting quarterbacks in the Conference Championship games recorded at least 35 touchdown passes in the regular season.

No matter the outcome of this Sunday’s games, Super Bowl LV will have the most or second-most combined regular season touchdown passes between the two starting quarterbacks ever.

The Super Bowls with the most combined regular season touchdown passes between the two starting quarterbacks:

SEASON – QUARTERBACKS (TOUCHDOWN PASSES) (TOTAL TOUCHDOWN PASSES)(SUPER BOWL)
2013 – Peyton Manning (55) & Russell Wilson (26) (81)(XLVIII)
1984 – Dan Marino (48) & Joe Montana (28) (76)(XIX)(HOF)
2007 – Tom Brady (50) & Eli Manning (23) (73)(XLII)

BRING IT HOME: Last week, Tampa Bay defeated New Orleans 30-20 to advance to their fourth NFC Championship Game in franchise history.

With a win at Green Bay on Sunday at Lambeau, the Buccaneers will become the first team to play in a Super Bowl in the team’s home stadium and the fifth team to play in a Super Bowl that was hosted in their home state.

The Super Bowls with a team playing in its home state:

SUPER BOWL – SITE (DATE; WINNING TEAM – LOSING TEAM)
XXXVII – San Diego, California (January 26, 2003; Tampa Bay – Oakland)
XIX – Stanford, Californa (January 20, 1985; San Francisco – Miami)
XIV – Pasadena, California (January 20, 1980; Pittsburgh – Los Angeles Rams)
XI – Pasadena, California (January 9, 1977; Oakland – Minnesota)

Tampa Bay quarterback Tom Brady enters Championship Sunday as the NFL’s all-time postseason leader in starts (43), wins (32), passing yards (11,968) and touchdown passes (77). He is expected to make his 14th career start in a Conference Championship game, and first with Tampa Bay.

If the Buccaneers advance to Super Bowl LV, Brady will become the fourth quarterback to start a Super Bowl for multiple teams, joining Peyton Manning (Denver and Indianapolis), Craig Morton (Dallas and Denver) and Pro Football Hall of Famer Kurt Warner (Arizona and St. Louis Rams).

The quarterbacks to start a Super Bowl for multiple teams in NFL history:

PLAYER – FIRST TEAM (SUPER BOWLS);SECOND TEAM (SUPER BOWLS)
Peyton Manning – Indianapolis (XLI, XLIV); Denver (XLVIII, 50)
Craig Morton – Dallas (V); Denver (XII)
Kurt Warner – St. Louis Rams (XXXIV, XXXVI); Arizona (XLIII)(HOF)

Tampa Bay cornerback Sean Murphy-Bunting has an interception in each of the Buccaneers’ two postseason games this season. With an interception on Sunday, Murphy-Bunting with become the fourth player to record an interception in each of his first three career postseason games in the Super Bowl era, joining Pro Football Hall of Famers Aeneas Williams (first four postseason games) and ED REED (three), as well as Jason Sehorn (three).

The players to record an interception in the most consecutive games to begin their postseason career in the Super Bowl era:

PLAYER, TEAMS; GAMES (DATES)
Aeneas Williams, Arizona and St. Louis Rams; 4 (January 2, 1998 – January 27, 2002) (HOF)
Ed Reed, Baltimore; 3 (January 3, 2004 – January 4, 2009) (HOF)
Jason Sehorn, New York Giants; 3 (December 27, 1997 – January 14, 2001)
Sean Murphy-Bunting, Tampa Bay; 2 (January 9, 2021 – January 17, 2021)*
*active streak

HUNTING MORE TITLES IN TITLETOWN: Green Bay advanced to their second consecutive Conference Championship with a 32-18 victory over the Los Angeles Rams in the Divisional Playoffs. With the win, Green Bay tied Pittsburgh (36 wins) for the second-most postseason victories in NFL history.

With a win against the Buccaneers on Sunday, the Packers would tie the NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS (37 wins) for the most postseason victories in NFL history.

The teams with the most postseason wins in NFL history:

TEAM – WINS / SUPER BOWL WINS
New England – 37 / 6
Green Bay – 36 / 4
Pittsburgh – 36 / 6
Dallas – 35 / 5
San Francisco – 32 / 5

Green Bay quarterback Aaron Rodgers led the NFL with a career-high 48 touchdown passes this season. If the Packers advance to Super Bowl LV, Rodgers will be the sixth quarterback since 2000 and first since Peyton Manning in 2013 to reach the Super Bowl in the same season that he led the league in touchdown passes.

The quarterbacks to lead the league in touchdown passes and reach the Super Bowl in the same season since 2000:

SEASON – PLAYER, TEAM (TOUCHDOWN PASSES – SUPER BOWL)
2013 – Peyton Manning, Denver (55 – XLVIII)
2009 – Drew Brees, New Orleans (34 – XLIV)
2007 – Tom Brady, New England (50 – XLII)
2006 – Peyton Manning, Indianapolis (31 – XLI)
2001 – Kurt Warner, St. Louis Rams (36 – XXXVI) (HOF)

Last week, Rodgers passed for 296 yards with two touchdowns and zero interceptions and a 108.1 rating, his eighth consecutive postseason game with at least two touchdown passes, tied with Joe Flacco (eight consecutive games) for the most consecutive postseason games with at least two touchdown passes in NFL history.

With at least two touchdown passes on Sunday, Rodgers will become the first player in league annals to record at least two touchdown passes in nine consecutive postseason games.

The players with the most consecutive postseason games with at least two touchdown passes in NFL history:

PLAYER, TEAM; GAMES (DATES)
Joe Flacco, Baltimore; 8 (January 15, 2012 – January 10, 2015)
Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay; 8 (January 10, 2016 – January 17, 2021)
*active streak

RUN IT BACK: The reigning Super Bowl champion Kansas City are hosting their third consecutive AFC Championship Game, joining the 2002-04 Philadelphia – who were also led by head coach Andy Reid – as the only teams in NFL history to host three consecutive Championship games. The Chiefs also look to become the first team since the 2003-04 New England Patriots to win back-to-back Super Bowl titles.

Last year, quarterback Patrick Mahomes became the youngest quarterback to win Super Bowl MVP. If Kansas City defeats Buffalo on Sunday at Arrowhead Stadium, Mahomes is expected to become the youngest quarterback in NFL history (25 years and 143 days old on date of Super Bowl LV) to start two Super Bowls, surpassing Russell Wilson, who was 26 years and 64 days old at the time of his second Super Bowl start (SB XLIX).

Last week, Kansas City tight end Travis Kelce recorded eight receptions for 109 yards and one touchdown, his fourth career postseason game with at least 100 receiving yards, tied for the most by a tight end in NFL history.

In 10 career postseason games, Kelce has totaled 60 catches for 741 yards and seven touchdowns, all among the most by a tight end in postseason history. Tampa Bay tight end Rob Gronkowski is the leader in all three categories.

The tight ends with the most career receptions in NFL postseason history:

PLAYER, TEAMS – RECEPTIONS
Rob Gronkowski, New England and Tampa Bay – 82*
Dallas Clark, Indianapolis – 64
Jay Novacek, Dallas – 62
Shannon Sharpe, Denver and Baltimore – 62 (HOF)
Brent Jones, San Francisco – 60
Travis Kelce; Kansas City – 60*
*active

The tight ends with the most career receiving yards in NFL postseason history:

PLAYER, TEAMS – RECEIVING YARDS
Rob Gronkowski, New England and Tampa Bay – 1,177*
Dallas Clark, Indianapolis – 847
Keith Jackson, Philadelphia, Miami and Green Bay – 834
Shannon Sharpe, Denver and Baltimore – 814 (HOF)
Travis Kelce, Kansas City – 741*
*active

The tight ends with the most career receiving touchdowns in NFL postseason history:

PLAYER, TEAMS – RECEIVING TOUCHDOWNS
Rob Gronkowski, New England and Tampa Bay – 12*
Dave Casper, Houston Oilers and Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders – 7 (HOF)
Vernon Davis, San Francisco and Denver – 7
Travis Kelce, Kansas City – 7*
*active

SUPER STEFON: Last week, Buffalo defeated Baltimore, 17-3, to advance to their first AFC Championship Game since the 1993 season.

Wide receiver Stefon Diggs recorded a team-high 106 receiving yards with a touchdown catch in the victory, after leading the league with a career-high 1,535 receiving yards in the 2020 regular season.

If Buffalo defeats Kansas City on Sunday, Diggs will become the third player to reach the Super Bowl in the same season that he led the league in receiving yards, joining Pro Football Hall of Famer Jerry Rice (1989 and 1994) and Drew Pearson (1977).

The players to lead the league in receiving yards and reach the Super Bowl in the same season in NFL history:

PLAYER, TEAM (SEASON – RECEIVING YARDS; SUPER BOWL)
Jerry Rice, San Francisco (1994 – 1,499; XXIX)(HOF)
Jerry Rice, San Francisco (1989 – 1,423; XXIV)(HOF)
Drew Pearson, Dallas (1977 – 870; XII)

RUNNING THROUGH THE NFC: Last week, Green Bay running back Aaron Jones rushed for 99 yards and a touchdown, his third consecutive postseason game with a rushing touchdown.

With a rushing touchdown in the NFC Championship Game, Jones will become the fourth player in NFL history to record a rushing touchdown in each of his first four postseason games, joining Pro Football Hall of Famers Terrell Davis (first seven postseason games) and Curtis Martin (first five games), as well as Arian Foster (first four games).

The players to record a rushing touchdown in the most consecutive games to begin their postseason career in NFL history:

PLAYER, TEAMS; GAMES (DATES)
Terrell Davis, Denver; 7 (January 4, 1997 – January 17, 1999)(HOF)
Curtis Martin, New England and New York Jets; 5 (January 5, 1997 – January 17, 1999) (HOF)
Arian Foster, Houston; 4 (January 7, 2012 – January 13, 2013)
Aaron Jones, Green Bay; 3 (January 12, 2020 – January 16, 2021)*
*Active streak

Tampa Bay running back Leonard Fournette recorded 107 scrimmage yards (63 rushing, 44 receiving) and a receiving touchdown in the Divisional Playoffs, his fourth consecutive postseason game with at least 75 scrimmage yards and a touchdown.

In the NFC Championship game, Fournette can become the fifth running back with at least 75 scrimmage yards and a touchdown in five consecutive postseason games in NFL history and will put himself in some pretty good company, joining Pro Football Hall of Famers Terrell Davis (seven games), Marcus Allen (five), Franco Harris (five) and John Riggins (five).

The running backs with the most consecutive postseason games with at least 75 scrimmage yards and a touchdown in NFL history:

PLAYER, TEAMS; GAMES (DATES)
Terrell Davis, Denver; 7 (January 4, 1997 – January 17, 1999) (HOF)
Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders; 5 (January 1, 1984 – January 5, 1986) (HOF)
Franco Harris, Pittsburgh; 5 (December 22, 1974 – January 4, 1976)(HOF)
John Riggins, Washington; 5 (January 15, 1983 – January 8, 1984) (HOF)
Leonard Fournette, Jacksonville and Tampa Bay; 4 (January 14, 2018 – January 17, 2021)*
*Active streak

As for last week? Much better (4-0 in the divisional round, 6-4 for the playoffs) than the 2-4 in the Wild Card round and four the year, that’s a 165-81 mark.

When the dust settles, there will be two more teams clearing out their lockers, while two teams will have a week off to prepare for a lot of the same questions they heard during the season in Tampa Bay when Super Bowl LV gets underway. Both contests are rematches from regular season play, which means that there are no secrets. For the teams that won the first time, they want to prove that the first time was not a fluke; for the losers, it’s revenge.

Win.

Advance.

Lose.

Your next game is in September (the 2021 NFL regular season gets underway September 8, in case you’re wondering). Here are the picks for Championship Sunday.

NFC: Tampa Bay (11-5) at Green Bay (13-3), 3:05 p.m. on FOX and FOX Deportes. It’s the Battle of the Bays, Round 2. This time, the setting is the land of cheese, beer and Bratwurst as number one-seed Green Bay and Aaron Rodgers play host to second-seeded Tampa Bay and Tom Brady at Lambeau Field to decide the winner of the George Halas Trophy and the NFC title.

The Buccaneers and Packers, division rivals in the NFC Central from 1977-2001, meet in the postseason for the second time. Green Bay won the only prior postseason meeting, 21-7, in the 1997 Divisional playoffs en route to a berth in Super Bowl XXXII.

Tampa Bay will appear in its fourth NFC Championship Game and its first since the 2002 season, when the Buccaneers won Super Bowl XXXVII.

Buccaneers head coach Bruce Arians, in his second season at the Tampa Bay helm, guided his team to its first franchise playoff berth in 13 years and its first postseason victories since that 2002 Super Bowl season. Arians also led the Arizona Cardinals to the NFC Championship Game in 2015 and is the 12th head coach since the league merger in 1970 to take multiple franchises to a conference Championship Game. This week, Tampa Bay quarterback Tom Brady is expected to make his 14th start in a conference Championship Game. Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Montana ranks second with seven. Brady is 9-4 in those games.

Green Bay registered the 36th postseason victory in franchise annals with the win at home against the Rams, tying the Pittsburgh Steelers (36) for the second-most postseason wins in history. With a win this week, Green Bay will tie the NFL record held by the New England Patriots (37).

Green Bay quarterback Aaron Rodgers passed for 296 yards and two touchdowns with no interceptions for a 108.1 passer rating in the Divisional round, marking his eighth consecutive postseason game with multiple touchdown passes, tying the NFL record held by JOE FLACCO (eight games from 2011-14).

Rodgers (12 career postseason games) is one of four players in history with at least 10 postseason games of 250-or-more passing yards and two-or-more touchdown passes. The others are Tom Brady (17), Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Montana (12) and Drew Brees (10).

Rodgers is expected to make his fifth career start in a Championship Game but his first at home. Rodgers led the NFL with a career-high 48 touchdown passes this season, tied with Pro Football Hall of Famer DAN MARINO (48 touchdown passes in 1984) for the fifth-most touchdown passes in a single season in NFL history. The Packers’ quarterback also led the NFL with a 121.5 passer rating, the second-highest single-season mark by a quarterback in NFL history, trailing only his 122.5 rating in 2011.

Rodgers enters Sunday’s game having thrown a touchdown pass in 15 consecutive postseason games, the fourth-longest streak in NFL history. Only Pro Football Hall of Famer Brett Farve (20 games from 1995-2009), Tom Brady (18 from 2001-11) and Drew Brees (18 from 2004-20) have longer streaks.

For Tampa Bay, the third time was the charm as they broke a 13-13 tie at the half against Drew Brees and New Orleans Sunday afternoon, leaving Mercedes-Benz Superdome. The Buccaneers would then proceed to take the lead for good early in the second half, using a 6-yard TD by Brady to RB Leonard Fournette, a 31-yard field goal by Ryan Succop and a 1-yard run by Brady to take the win in the Big Easy, after the Saints reclaimed the lead earlier on a 16-yard toss from Brees to WR Tre’Quan Smith (Smith had caught a TD pass from backup QB Jameis Winston earlier in the contest).

Tampa Bay out-rushed New Orleans 127-104 with Saints RB Alvin Kamara leading all rushers with 85 yards (Fournette led Tampa Bay with 63); Brady threw for 199 yards and threw TD passes to Fournette and WR Mike Evans and was sacked once, while Brees threw for 134 yards with three interceptions in addition to the second Smith TD pass (Winston threw for 56 yards with the first Smith TD). Tampa Bay was 8 for 17 on third down but struck gold in their only fourth down try, while the Saints on third down were 6 for 11 and the clock was the ally of Tampa Bay, who held on to the pigskin for 31:31 to New Orleans’ 28:29.

Green Bay secured the right to host the NFC Championship game at Lambeau after their 32-18 win over the Los Angeles Rams last Saturday afternoon. Green Bay broke a 3-3 tie at the end of the first quarter and took a 19-10 lead with them to the break. Aaron Jones would give the Packers a 15-point lead with 12:10 left in the third on a 1-yard run as Green Bay would use a 6-play, 75-yard drive that would use 2:50 of clock to start the third. The Rams’ Cam Akers would then pull his club to within 7 late in the third before the Packers would regain control of matters, with Rogers and WR Alan Lazard connecting on a 58-yard TD strike late in the final quarter. Green Bay would then proceed to stop a late Rams’ drive to take the win and move on to the next round.

Jones led Green Bay with 99 yards, while Akers led the Rams with 90 yards (both had a rushing TD) as the Packers outrushed the Rams 188-96; Rodgers threw for 296 yards and a pair of TDs (one to Davante Adams in addition to the strike to Lazard, Rodgers had a rushing TD) without a sack or interception, while Jared Goff threw for 174 yards and a TD to WR Van Jefferson) but was sacked four times. Green Bay, with 484 yards of total offense, went 8 for 12 on third down and they were rulers of the clock, keeping the ball for 36:12, while the Rams, who kept the pigskin for 23:48, went 2 of 8 on third down, 0 for 1 on fourth down.

They met in the Sunshine State in weekk six and Mason Crosby and Aaron Jones would give the Packers an early 10-0 lead on a 39-yard field goal and a 1-yard run, then watched Brady and the Buccaneers score 38 points unchallenged to give Tampa Bay the 38-10 win at Raymond James Stadium in week six. Using a Jamel Dean interception and a Tyler Johnson TD pass, Tampa Bay would take the lead for good, taking a 28-10 lead with them to the intermission. Tampa Bay would then floor the gas in the third, using a Ryan Succop field goal and a Ronald Jones rushing TD to close things out.

Jones led all rushers with 113 yards and a pair of TDs as the Buccaneers out-rushed Green Bay 158-94; Brady threw for 166 yards and a pair of TDs (including one to Rob Gronkowski), while Rodgers threw for 160 yards with four sacks and a pair of interceptions. Tampa Bay was 5 of 12 on third down and they held on to the ball for 28:23, while the Packers, going 7 for 17 on third down, actually ruled the clock and held on to the pigskin for 31:37.

Green Bay was favored by 1 in the week six contest in the Sunshine State and Tampa Bay easily covered, winning by 28 but both teams missed the 55 over/under, tallying 48 points. This time, the Packers are favored again by 3 1/2 at Lambeau and the over/under’s 51. Tampa Bay’s looking to prove that the first meeting was not a fluke and wants to be the first team to play a Super Bowl in their facility in two weeks. The Packers? They’re looking for revenge from their loss in the Sunshine State and wants to get themselves another Lombardi Trophy. A Bay will be playing in the Super Bowl and that Bay will be Green. Packers cover the 3 1/2 at Lambeau and takes the win in the land of beer, cheese and Bratwurst.

AFC: Buffalo (13-3) at Kansas City (14-2), 6:40 p.m. on CBS, CBS All Access and ESPN Deportes. wings vs. BBQ. Championship week closes out in the Show-Me State as second-seeded Buffalo takes on top-seed Kansas City at Arrowhead. The winner will get the Lamar Hunt Trophy and will make their way to Tampa to face either Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers or Aaron Rodgers and the Green Bay Packers in two weeks’ time.

The Bills and Chiefs meet in the postseason for the fourth time, and first time in Kansas City, with Buffalo winning two of the three previous matchups. Buffalo last appeared in the AFC Championship in the 1993 season, when the Bills defeated Kansas City, 30-13, to earn a berth in Super Bowl XXVIII. Two years earlier, Buffalo beat the Chiefs, 37-14, in the 1991 AFC Divisional round, en route to Super Bowl XXVI. Kansas City won the first postseason matchup in the series, 31-7, in the 1966 American Football League title game to earn a berth in the first AFL-NFL World Championship (later renamed the Super Bowl).
Sunday marks the 50th all-time meeting, including the postseason, between the clubs. Buffalo holds a 26-22-1 advantage in the series. The Bills will play in the franchise’s ninth AFL/AFC Championship Game. Buffalo is 6-2 in those games, having won four straight (1990-93).

Sean McDermott, who has led the Bills to the playoffs in three of his four seasons as head coach, worked 12 years (1999-2010) with Andy Reid on the Eagles’ staff. In total, McDermott has coached in five conference Championships and two Super Bowls. He will be making his first Championship Game appearance as a head coach.

Buffalo quarterback Josh Allen completed 23 of 37 passes for 206 yards and a touchdown with no interceptions for an 86.1 rating in Buffalo’s 17-3 Divisional playoff win over Baltimore. One week earlier, in the Bills’ Wild Card victory over the Colts, Allen became the first player in NFL history to pass for at least 300 yards with a completion percentage of 70 or higher and rush for 50-or-more yards in a postseason game. During the regular season, Allen had 4,544 passing yards with 37 touchdown passes and eight rushing touchdowns, becoming the first player with at least 4,500 passing yards, 35 touchdown passes and five rushing touchdowns in a single season in NFL history.

Bills cornerback Taron Johnson in the Divisional playoff victory returned an interception 101 yards for a touchdown, tied with Green Bay’s George Teague (1993) for the longest interception return in NFL postseason history.

Kansas City will play in the team’s seventh AFL/AFC Championship Game and are the first team to host three consecutive Championship Games since the 2002-04 Philadelphia Eagles. Andy Reid, who also served as head coach of those Eagles teams, makes his eighth conference Championship appearance as a head coach, surpassing Pro Football Hall of Famers Chuck Noll (seven) and Don Shula (seven) for the third-most by a head coach since 1970. Only Bill Belichick (13) and Pro Football Hall of Famer Tom Landry (10) have more.

With a start on Sunday, Patrick Mahomes can become the 12th quarterback since the league merger in 1970 to start three consecutive conference Championship Games and the first to accomplish the feat prior to his 26th birthday.

Buffalo broke a 3-3 tie against Lamar Jackson and the Baltimore Ravens last Saturday night in upstate New York, scoring 14 third quarter points unchecked and came away 17-3 winners at Bills Stadium. Buffalo took the lead for good when Allen and WR Stefon Diggs connected on a 3-yard TD toss in the third quarter. Then late in the third, the Bills not only stopped a Ravens’ rally, they put a dagger into Baltimore’s hopes as CB Taron Johnson picked Jackson and returned the ball 101 yards for the final score of the contest.

The one bright spot for the Ravens was they out-rushed the Bills 150-32 with Gus Edwards and J.K. Dobbins each tallying 42 yards; Allen threw for 206 yards and the Diggs TD without an interceptions (Allen was sacked twice), while Jackson threw for 162 yards with the inteception to Johnson, was sacked four times and would eventually leave the contest with a concussion. Buffalo was 4 for 13 on third down and the Bills kept the ball for 24:27, while the Ravens actually ruled the clock, keeping the pigskin for 35:33, going 7 for 17 on third down, 0 for 2 on fourth down.

The Chiefs will be in their third consecutive AFC Championship game at Arrowhead in a row after they survived a late charge by Baker Mayfield and the Cleveland Browns, coming away 22-17 winners last Sunday. Kansas City led 6-3 at the end of the first quarter, then proceeded to scored 13 second-quarter points unchallenged, thanks to a 20-yard TD pass from Patrick Mahomes to TE Travis Kelce and a pair of Harrison Butker field goals to lead 19-3 at the half. After Mayfield and WR Josh Landry connected on a 4-yard TD toss to pull Cleveland to within nine, Butker would push the Chiefs back to a 12-point lead with 4:24 left in the third. Cleveland was not about to go away quietly and the Browns would cause some angst for Chiefs fans, as they would use an 18-play, 75-yard drive that used 8:17 of clock with Kareem Hunt getting some measure of revenge on his old team, scoring from three yards out early in the final quarter.

The Chiefs would find themselves in a bind as Mahomes would be knocked out of the contest with a concussion, putting backup QB Chad Henne into the contest. After holding off the Browns and forcing a Cleveland punt, Kansas City would get the ball back with 4:09 left in the contest and it would be the last time the Cleveland would see the ball, as Henne would run out the clock, throwing a 5-yard pass to WR Tyree Hill to basically end the contest. Kansas City out-rushed Cleveland 123-112 with Darrell Williams leading the way with 78 yards, while Cleveland was led by Nick Chubb with 69 yards on the ground; Mahomes threw for 255 yards with the TD pass to Kelce and had a rushing TD of his own to open the scoring in the contest before leaving, while Mayfield threw for 204 yards with the game’s only sack and had an interception (Henne threw for 66 yards with a sack and an interception). Kansas City went 5 for 10 on third down but had success on fourth down, going 2 for 2 (including the fourth down try that sealed the contest) and were rulers of the clock, holding on to the ball for 30:37, while the Browns, who kept the pigskin for 29:23, went 6 of 13 on third down, 3 for 3 on fourth down.

They met in upstate New York in week six in a contest that was scheduled to be played on October 15 but moved because of COVID issues with the Bills and the home teams would be manhandled by Mahomes and the Chiefs 26-17. Kansas City led 13-10 at the half, using a pair of Mahomes to Kelce TD tosses, then outscored the Bills 13-7 in the closing 30 minutes of the contest. Kansas City RB Clyde Edwards-Helaire led all rushers with 161 yards as the Chiefs out-rushed Buffalo 245-84 and Mahomes threw for 225 yards and a pair of TDs (both to Kelce) and was sacked once, while Allen threw for 122 yards with TDs to Diggs and Cole Beasley, throwing the contest’s only interception. The Chiefs were 9 of 14 on third down and converted the contest’s only fourth down try, ruling the clock, as they kept the ball for 37:45, while the Bills were 22:15 in possession time, going 4 for 9 on third down.

As far as the post-season goes: Kansas City and Buffalo have met three times in post-season play and the Bills have come away with wins in two of those contests (which includes contests that took place at War Memorial Stadium and Swope Field). Their last post-season meeting took place in the 1993 AFC Championship Game in Orchard Park, with the Bills cirlcing the wagons to take a 30-13 win; Kansas City’s last win came in 1966, when both clubs were members of the AFL as they would come away 31-7 winners in upstate New York.

In the week six contest in upstate New York (the first of two games on Monday), the Chiefs were 3 1/2 point favorites and covered, winning by 9 but both clubs missed the 57 1/2 over/under, tallying 43 points. Vegas likes the Chiefs again, this time by 3 in the Show-Me State and the over/under’s 54. For the Bills, it was fun while it lasted. BBQ beats wings again this time. Chiefs cover the 3 and takes the win at Arrowhead.

Broadcast Information (times listed are Eastern)
NFC: Tampa Bay (11-5) at Green Bay (13-3), 3:10 p.m. on FOX and FOX Deportes: Joe Buck, Troy Aikman, Erin Andrews (field reporter), Tom Rinaldi (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Kevin Harlan, Kurt Warner, Laura Okmin; SIRIUS: 82 (Tampa Bay), 83 (Green Bay); XM: 226 (Tampa Bay), 225 (Green Bay), 88 (National)

AFC: Buffalo (13-3) at Kansas City (14-2), 6:40 p.m. on CBS, CBS All Access and ESPN Deportes: Jim Nantz, Tony Romo, Tracy Wolfson (field reporter), Evan Washburn (field reporter); NATIONAL RADIO: Westwood One: Ian Eagle, Tony Boselli, Ross Tucker; SIRIUS: 82 (Buffalo), 83 (Kansas City); XM: 226 (Buffalo), 225 Kansas City), 88 (National)

Officials
NFC: Tampa Bay (11-5) at Green Bay (13-3), 3:10 p.m.: Clete Blakeman
AFC: Buffalo (13-3) at Kansas City (14-2), 6:40 p.m.: Bill Vinovich

Injury Report
NFC: Tampa Bay (11-5) at Green Bay (13-3), 3:10 p.m.

Tampa Bay

OUT: WR Antonio Brown (knee)
QUESTIONABLE: S Antoine Winfield (ankle)

Green Bay

OUT: DE Kingsley Keke (concussion)
QUESTIONABLE: CB Kevin King (back)

AFC: Buffalo (13-3) at Kansas City (14-2), 6:40 p.m.

Buffalo

QUESTIONABLE:
DT Vernon Butler (quadricep), WR Gabriel Davis (ankle

Kansas City

OUT: LB Willie Gay (ankle)
QUESTIONABLE: RB Le’Veon Bell (knee), CB Bashaud Breeland (concussion, shoulder), RB Clyde Edwards-Helaire (ankle, hip), CB Rashad Fenton (foot), WR Sammy Watkins (calf)

Weather
NFC: Tampa Bay (11-5) at Green Bay (13-3), 3:10 p.m.: Overcast and 29 degrees
AFC: Buffalo (13-3) at Kansas City (14-2), 6:40 p.m.: Overcast and 40 degrees

Broadcast Information, officials and injury report courtesy the National Football League, odds courtesy Don Best, weather information courtesy The Weather Channel