A sampling of NFL records set and milestones reached in 2016 (courtesy the National Football League and NFL Communications):

THE TEAMS

ARIZONA CARDINALS: Led the NFC in total defense (305.2 yards per game) and sacks (48).

QB Carson Palmer passed for 4,233 yards, his franchise-best third season with 3,500+ pass yards.

RB David Johnson set single-season franchise records in scrimmage yards (2,118), rushing touchdowns (16) and total touchdowns (20).

ATLANTA FALCONS: Won the NFC South division title for the first time since 2012. Ranked first in the NFL in total points (540) and second in total offense (415.8 yards per game).

QB Matt Ryan set a franchise record and ranked second in the NFL with 4,944 passing yards. Ryan has six seasons with at least 4,000 passing yards, the most seasons in franchise history. He also owns the top six passing yardage seasons in team history.

WR Julio Jones ranked second in the NFL with 1,409 receiving yards, his fourth season with at least 1,000 receiving yards, tied for the second most in franchise history.

In Week 4, became the first team in NFL history to have a 500-yard passer (Ryan, 503) and a 300-yard receiver (Jones, 300) in the same game. Jones’ 300 receiving yards and Ryan’s 503 passing yards both set franchise single-game records.

BALTIMORE RAVENS: QB Joe Flacco passed for 4,317 yards, a career-high and single-season franchise record. Flacco recorded his seventh career season with 3,000+ passing yards, the most in franchise history.

TE Dennis Pitta had 86 receptions, the most by tight end in a single season in franchise history.

BUFFALO BILLS: Set a franchise record with 29 rushing touchdowns and led the NFL in rushing yards per game (164.4).

RB Le Sean McCoy had 13 rushing touchdowns, tied for the second-most in a season in franchise history. McCoy had four games with 100+ rushing yards and multiple rushing touchdowns this season, tied for the most in Bills history.

CAROLINA PANTHERS: Defeated Arizona 30-20 in Week 8 in a rematch of last season’s NFC Championship Game and became the first team since Tampa Bay in 2002-03 to win both a Championship Game and the rematch the following season by 10+ points each.

QB Cam Newton set franchise records in passing touchdowns (136) and rushing touchdowns (48).

RB Jonathan Stewart has 51 career total touchdowns, third-most in franchise history.

CHICAGO BEARS: Rookie RB Jordan Howard ranked second in the NFL with 1,313 rushing yards and surpassed Matt Forte (1,238 in 2008) as the Bears’ all-time rookie rushing leader. Howard had seven 100-yard rushing games this season, the most games with 100+ rushing yards by a rookie in team history.

Howard gained 202 yards from scrimmage (153 rushing, 49 receiving), including a rushing touchdown, in Week 8 and became the youngest player (21 years, 363 days) in Bears history to record at least 200 scrimmage yards in a single game.

In Week 13, Howard became the fifth rookie in Bears history to rush for three touchdowns in a single game.

CINCINNATI BENGALS: QB Andy Dalton had 4,206 passing yards, his second career season with 4,000+ pass yards (4,293 in 2013) and joined Carson Palmer (two) as the only quarterbacks in team history with multiple 4,000-yard passing seasons.

RB Jeremy Hill had nine rushing touchdowns and has at least nine rushing touchdowns in three consecutive seasons, the second-longest streak in franchise history.

LB Vontaze Burfict has three seasons with 100+ tackles (101 in 2016), tied for the second-most in franchise history.

CLEVELAND BROWNS: WR Terrelle Pryor, Sr. had 1,007 receiving yards and became the seventh wide receiver in franchise history with a 1,000-yard receiving season.

LB Christian Kirksey had 143 tackles, the eighth-most in a season in team history.

DALLAS COWBOYS: Won the NFC East division title for the second time in the past three seasons and won 11 consecutive games from Weeks 2-13, tied for the longest winning streak in franchise history.

Ranked first in the NFL in rush defense, allowing 83.5 yards per game.

QB Dak Prescott and RB Ezekiel Elliott became the first rookie quarterback and running back duo to start a season opener for the Cowboys since Pro Football Hall of Fame QB Roger Staubach and RB Calvin Hill in 1969.

Became the first team in NFL history to have a rookie pass for 20 touchdowns (Prescott, 23) and a rookie rush for 15 touchdowns (Elliott, 15) in the same season.

In Week 9, Prescott had three touchdown passes and Elliott rushed for two touchdowns, marking the second time in NFL history in which a rookie passed for three touchdowns and a rookie teammate rushed for two touchdowns in the same game.

WR Dez Bryant has 67 career touchdown catches and surpassed Pro Football Hall of Famer Michael Irvin (65) for the second-most in franchise history.

DENVER BRONCOS: Led the NFL in pass defense, allowing 185.8 yards per game.

In Week 10, rookie Justin Simmons blocked an extra-point attempt with 1:22 remaining in the fourth quarter and rookie Will Parks returned it for the game-winning two-point conversion in Denver’s 25-23 win at New Orleans. It marked the first-ever game-winning defensive two-point conversion since the rule was adopted in 2015 and the first to give the scoring team the lead.

DETROIT LIONS: Earned a playoff berth for the second time in the past three seasons.

Had eight wins after trailing in the fourth quarter or overtime, the most in a single season in NFL history.

JiM Caldwell became the third head coach in franchise history to lead the Lions to the playoffs twice in his first three seasons.

QB Matthew Stafford passed for 4,327 yards, fifth-most in a season in team history and had a 93.3 passer rating, third-highest in team history.

GREEN BAY PACKERS: Won the NFC North division title for the fifth time in the past six seasons and have 217 victories at Lambeau Field, surpassing Chicago (216 at Wrigley Field) for the most wins by any franchise at one stadium in NFL history.

QB Aaron Rodgers passed for 4,428 yards, his sixth career season with at least 4,000 passing yards, surpassing Pro Football Hall of Famer Brett (five) for the most in franchise history.

Rodgers and WR Jordy Nelson have connected on 59 touchdown passes, surpassing Favre and Antonio Freeman (57) for the most touchdown passes from a quarterback to a receiver in franchise history.

WR Davante Adams had 25 total receptions in Weeks 7 and 8, the most in a two-game span in Packers history.

RB Ty Montgomery rushed for 162 yards and two touchdowns in Week 15 at Chicago and became the second Packer to rush for at least 150 yards and two touchdowns in a game against the Bears (Ahman Green, September 29, 2003).

HOUSTON TEXANS: Won the AFC South division title for the second consecutive season. It is the second time in franchise history the team has won back-to-back division titles (2011-12).

Led the NFL in total defense (301.3 yards per game).

WR De Andre Hopkins has 317 career receptions and surpassed Andre Johnson (312) for the most receptions in a player’s first four seasons in franchise history.

S Quinton Demps had six interceptions, tied for the second-most in a season in franchise history.

INDIANAPOLIS COLTS: WR T.Y. Hilton led the NFL with 1,448 receiving yards and has four seasons with at least 1,000 receiving yards, the third-most in franchise history.

JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS: In Week 16, QB Blake Brotles and WR Marqise Lee became the first pair of teammates in NFL history to throw touchdown passes of at least 20 yards to each other in the same game.

WR Allen Robinson joined Jimmy Smith as the only players in team history with at least 800 receiving yards and six touchdown receptions in consecutive seasons.

LB Paul Posluszny had 132 tackles and has five seasons with 100+ tackles with the Jaguars, the most in franchise history.

DE Yannick Ngakoue had eight sacks, the most by a rookie in franchise history.

KANSAS CITY CHIEFS: Won the AFC West division title for the first time since 2010.

Ranked first in the NFL with 33 takeaways and tied for the league lead with a +16 turnover differential.

QB Alex Smith has 1,317 rushing yards in four seasons with Kansas City and surpassed Pro Football Hall of Famer Len Dawson (1,253) for the most career rushing yards by a quarterback in franchise history.

Rookie WR-PR-KR Tyreek Hill had 12 touchdowns (6 receiving, 3 rushing, 2 punt return, 1 kick return), tied for the most by a rookie in franchise history.

Hill had a 95-yard punt-return touchdown in Week 17, the longest punt-return touchdown in team history.

Overcame a 21-point deficit in their 33-27 overtime victory against San Diego in Week 1 and became the first team in NFL history to extend a winning streak of at least 10 games with a 21+ point comeback victory.

LOS ANGELES RAMS: TE Lance Kendricks has 17 career touchdown catches and surpassed Billy Truax (16) for the second-most touchdowns by a tight end in franchise history.

WR-PR Tavon Austin has 146 career punt returns and tied Le Roy Irvin (146) for the most punt returns in team history.

MIAMI DOLPHINS: Earned a postseason berth for the first time since 2008.

RB Jay Ajayi had 1,272 rush yards, the third-highest single-season total in franchise history.

Ajayi rushed for 204 yards and two touchdowns in the Dolphins’ 30-15 win over Pittsburgh in Week 6 in Miami and joined Ricky Williams as the only players in franchise history to rush for at least 200 yards and two touchdowns in a game. Ajayi is the first Dolphin to rush for at least 200 yards in three games in a season.

WR Jarvis Landry had 94 receptions, the second-most catches in a season in Dolphins history. Landry also owns the single-season team record with 110 catches in 2015.

Rookie RB-KR Kenyan Drake had a 96-yard kickoff-return touchdown in Week 9, the second-longest by a rookie in franchise history (Mercury Morris, 105 yards, Septermber, 14, 1969).

MINNESOTA VIKINGS: Joined the 1969 Los Angeles Rams as the only teams since 1933 to start 5-0 without throwing an interception. Minnesota had eight sacks at Carolina in Week 3, tied for the third-most in a road game in team history.

CB Xavier Rhodes had a 100-yard interception-return touchdown and KR Cordarrelle Patterson had a 104-yard kickoff-return touchdown in Week 11 and became the first team since the 1962 Dallas Cowboys to have a 100+ yard interception-return touchdown and a 100+ yard kickoff-return touchdown in the same game. Minnesota is the fourth team in NFL history with two scoring plays of at least 100 yards in the same game and Rhodes’ 100-yard interception-return touchdown was the longest in franchise history.

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS: Won the AFC East division title for the eighth consecutive season, the longest streak in NFL history. The Patriots are the only team in league history to win 13 division titles in a 14-year span.

New England ecorded their sixth season with at least 13 victories (14-2), tied with Denver for the second most 13-win seasons in NFL history.

The Pats became the fifth team in NFL history – and the first since the 1983-1998 San Francisco 49ers – to have at least 16 consecutive seasons with a .500 or better record.

Head coach Bill Belichick has 201 regular-season victories with New England and joined Pro Football Hall of Famers George Halas (318 with Chicago), Don Shula (257 with Miami), Tom Landry (250 with Dallas) and Curly Lambeau (209 with Green Bay) as the only coaches to reach 200 career regular-season wins with one franchise.

Belichick has 260 career victories (including the postseason) and joins Pro Football Hall of Famers Don Shula (347), George Halas (324) and Tom Landry (270) as the only head coaches in NFL history with at least 250 career wins.

RB Le Garrette Blount set a franchise record with 18 rushing touchdowns.

WR Julian Edleman ranks second in franchise history with three seasons of 90+ receptions (98 in 2016).

NEW ORLEANS SAINTS: Led the NFL in total offense (426.0 yards per game) and ranked first with 6,816 total net yards (5,074 passing, 1,742 rushing).

QB Drew Brees has 53,763 pass yards in 11 seasons with New Orleans and became the sixth quarterback in NFL history to pass for 50,000 yards with one team.

WR Michael Thomas set franchise rookie records and led all NFL rookies with 92 receptions, 1,137 receiving yards and nine touchdown catches.

NEW YORK GIANTS: Earned a playoff berth for the first time since 2011.

QB Eli Manning passed for 4,027 yards, his franchise-record sixth season with 4,000+ passing yards.

WR Odell Beckham, Jr. had a career-high 101 receptions and joined Steve Smith (107 in 2009) as the only players in franchise history with a 100-catch season. Beckham had 1,367 receiving yards, the third-most in a single season in team history.

S Landon Collins had 125 tackles, the most by a safety in a season in franchise history.

Collins and CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie each recorded two interceptions in Week 7, the first Giants duo to accomplish the feat since Kenny Hill and Terry Kinard on September 14, 1986 against San Diego.

NEW YORK JETS: RBs Matt Forte (1,110) and Bilal Powell (1,076) became the first running back duo in franchise history with 1,000+ scrimmage yards each.

OAKLAND RAIDERS: Earned a playoff berth for the first time since 2002. Oakland tied for the NFL lead with a +16 turnover differential.

In Week 1, the Sliver and Black became the fourth team in NFL history to score the game-winning points on a two-point conversion in the final minute of the fourth quarter when QB Derek Carr connected with WR Michael Crabtree on the game-winning two-point conversion with 47 seconds remaining. They are the first to do so in a season opener.

Carr passed for four touchdowns and no interceptions in Week 4 and became the first Raiders quarterback to have a four TD and zero interception performance in back-to-back seasons since Rich Gannon in 1999 and 2000. Carr also accomplished the feat on November 1, 2015.

Crabtree had three touchdown receptions in Week 4 and became the first Raider to have three touchdown catches in a game since Jerry Porter on December 19, 2004.

WR Amari Cooper (1,153) and Crabtree (1,003) became the first Oakland duo since 2001 (Jerry Rice and Tim Brown) and third in franchise history to each have at least 1,000 receiving yards in the same season.

LB Bruce Irvin had six forced fumbles, tied for the most in a single season in team history.

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES: Rookie QB Carson Wentz became the first Eagles rookie to start at quarterback in a season opener since Davey O’Brien in 1939.

Wentz had 379 completions, the most in a season in franchise history and the most by a rookie in NFL history.

K Caleb Sturgis made 35 field goals, the most in a season in franchise history.

Philadelphia had kickoff-return touchdowns in Week 6 (Wendell Smallwood, 86 yards) and Week 7 (Josh Huff, 98 yards) and became the fifth team since 1970 to have kickoff-return touchdowns by different players in consecutive weeks.

PITTSBURGH STEELERS: Won the AFC North division title, their seventh division title since 2002.

The Steelers have 601 regular-season victories, joining Chicago (744), Green Bay (730) and the New York Giants (684) as the only teams in NFL history to reach 600 regular-season wins.

QB Ben Roethlisberger and WR Antonio Brown have combined for 50 touchdown passes and surpassed Pro Football Hall of Famers Terry Bradshaw and Lynn Swann (49) for the most touchdown passes from a quarterback to receiver in team history.

Roethlisberger had 15 touchdown passes through Week 5, the most by a Steelers quarterback in the first five games of a season.

K Chris Boswell made six field goals in Week 15, tied with Gary Anderson (10/23/88) and Jeff Reed (12/1/02) for the most in a single game in franchise history.

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS: QB Philip Rivers passed for 4,386 yards, his team-record eighth season with at least 4,000 passing yards. Rivers had 33 touchdown passes, tied for the second-most in a season in franchise history and has five 30-touchdown seasons, the most in Chargers history.

Rookie DE Joey Bosa (10.5) became the first Chargers rookie to record 10 or more sacks since 2005 (Shawn Merriman, 10.0).

SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS: Rookie DL De Forest Buckner had 6 sacks, tied for the fifth-most by a rookie in franchise history.

SEATTLE SEAHAWKS: Won the NFC West division title for the third time in the past four seasons and advanced to the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season.

QB Russell wilson passed for 4,219 yards, the most in a season in franchise history.

TE Jimmy Graham had 65 receptions for 923 yards, the highest totals by a tight end in franchise history.

LB Bobby Wagner led the NFL and set a single-season franchise record with 167 tackles.

TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS: QB Jameis Winston set franchise single-season records with 4,090 passing yards and 28 touchdown passes.

WR Mike Evans had 96 receptions, the second-most in franchise history.

Evans had 12 touchdown catches, tied for the most in a season in team history.

TE Cameron Brate had eight receiving touchdowns, tied for the most by a Buccaneers tight end in a season.

TENNESSEE TITANS: QB Marcus Mariota had 26 touchdown passes and joined Pro Football Hall of Famers George Blanda and Warren Moon as the only quarterbacks in franchise history to pass for at least 25 touchdowns in a season.

TE Delanie Walker had seven touchdown receptions, the third-most among tight ends in franchise history.

WASHINGTON REDSKINS: QB Kirk Cousins set a franchise record and ranked third in the NFL with 4,917 passing yards.

Cousins has 18 career games with at least 300 passing yards, surpassing Pro Football Hall of Famer Sonny Jurgensen (15) for the most in franchise history.

WR De Sean Jackson had 1,005 receiving yards, his second 1,000-yard season with Washington, and is the eighth player in franchise history with multiple seasons of at least 1,000 receiving yards.

TE Jordan Reed has 248 career receptions and surpassed Don Warren (244) for the third-most catches among tight ends in team history.

THE PLAYERS

ACCOMPLISHMENT(S)

JAY AJAYI – RB, Miami Dolphins: Rushed for 204 yards in Week 6 and 214 yards in Week 7 and became the fourth player in NFL history to rush for at least 200 yards in consecutive games, joining Pro Football Hall of Famers O.J. Simpson (twice) and Earl Campbell and Ricky Williams.

Ajayi ecame the first player since 1970 to rush for 200 yards in two of his first three career starts, became the fourth player in NFL history to record three games with at least 200 rushing yards in a single season, joining Pro Football Hall of Famers Earl Campbell (four in 1980) and O.J. Simpson (three in 1973) and Tiki Barber (three in 2005).

Ajayi had 420 rushing yards in two games against Buffalo in 2016, the fourth-highest rushing total against one team in a single season.

LORENZO ALEXANDER –  LB, Buffalo Bills: Entered the season with nine career sacks in nine seasons and became the first player to begin his career in 1982 or later with a career total of fewer than 10 sacks to record at least 10 sacks (12.5) in his 10th NFL season.

DWAYNE ALLEN – TE, Indianapolis Colts – Had three touchdown receptions in the first half of the Colts’ 41-10 win at the New York Jets in Week 13 on Monday Night Football and joined Pro Football Hall of Famer Jerry Rice (December 18, 1995) as the only players to have three touchdown catches in the first half of a Monday Night Football game.

VIC BEASLEY JR. – LB, Atlanta Falcons: Led the NFL with 15.5 sacks.

Beasley three sacks, one forced fumble and a 21-yard fumble-return touchdown in Week 14 and became the 10th NFL player – and first Falcon – to record three sacks and a fumble-return touchdown in a single game since 1982.

ODELL BECKHAM JR. – WR, New York Giants: Ranked third in the NFL with 101 receptions and 1,367 receiving yards.

Has 288 career receptions, tied with Jarvis Landry for the most receptions in a player’s first three seasons in NFL history.

Has 11 career games with at least 140 receiving yards, the most in a player’s first three seasons in NFL history.

Beckham beame the first player in NFL history to record at least 80 catches and 1,000 receiving yards in each of his first three seasons and joined John Jefferson (1978-1980) and Randy Moss (1998-2000) as the only players in NFL history with at least 1,000 receiving yards and 10 touchdown catches in each of his first three seasons.

Beckham reached 3,000 receiving yards in his 30th career game, the fastest in NFL history (Charley Hennigan, 31 games).

LE’VEON BELL – RB, Pittsburgh Steelers: Led the AFC with 1,884 scrimmage yards (1,268 rush, 616 receiving).

Bell averaged 157.0 scrimmage yards per game in 2016, the third-highest single-season average in NFL history and had 236 rushing yards with three touchdowns and four catches for 62 yards in Week 14 and became the second player in NFL history with at least 225 rushing yards, three rushing touchdowns and 50 receiving yards in a single game, joining Pro Football Hall of Famer Jim Brown (November 19, 1961).

ERIC BERRY – S, Kansas City Chiefs: Intercepted a two-point conversion attempt and returned it for the go-ahead score with 4:32 remaining in the fourth quarter in the Chiefs’ 29-28 victory at Atlanta in Week 13, marking the first game-winning defensive two-point conversion scored when his team was trailing since the rule was adopted in 2015. Berry, who also returned an interception 37 yards for a touchdown in the contest, became the first player to return an interception for both a touchdown and a two-point conversion in the same game.

ANQUAN BOLDIN – WR, Detroit Lions: Had eight touchdown catches in 2016 and became the second player in NFL history (Terrell Owens) to have at least 1,000 career receptions (1,076) and record a touchdown catch with four different teams (Arizona, Baltimore, Detroit, San Francisco).

Is the fourth player in NFL history to have a season with at least five touchdown receptions with four different teams (Arizona, Baltimore, Detroit, San Francisco), joining Terrell Owens (five teams), Irving Fryar and Brandon Marshall as the only players in league annals to accomplish the feat.

Played in his 200th career game in Week 15 and his 1,067 career receptions are the fourth-most in a player’s first 200 games.

JOEY BOSA – DE, San Diego Chargers: Led all rookies with 10.5 sacks, the highest total by a rookie since 2011 (Aldon Smith, 14.0).

SAM BRADFORD – QB, Minnesota Vikings: Completed 395 of 552 passes for a 71.6 completion percentage in 2016, the highest single-season completion percentage in NFL history, surpassing Drew Brees’ mark of 71.2 percent (468 of 657) in 2011.

TOM BRADY – QB, New England Patriots: Has 205 career victories including the postseason, the most by a starting quarterback in NFL history.

Brady became the fifth player in NFL history to reach 60,000 passing yards (61,582), joining Peyton Manning (71,940), Brett Farve (71,838), Drew Brees (66,111) and Dan Marino (61,361).

Brady has 5,244 career completions and became the fourth player in NFL history to reach 5,000 completions, joining Pro Football Hall of Famer Brett Farve (6,300), Peyton Manning (6,125) and Drew Brees (5,836).

Brady threw 28 touchdown passes with two interceptions in 2016, recording the highest touchdown/interception ratio in NFL history, has 21 career games with at least four touchdown passes and no interceptions, the most in NFL history and as passed for 28,678 yards at Gillette Stadium and surpassed Brett Farve (28,240 at Green Bay’s Lambeau Field) for the most passing yards by a quarterback at a single stadium in NFL history.

DREW BREES – QB, New Orleans Saints: Has 66,111 career pass yards and surpassed Pro Football Hall of Famer Dan Marino (61,361) for the third-most all-time. Led the NFL with 5,208 passing yards, his NFL-record 5th season with 5,000+ passing yards.

Brees had 37 touchdown passes and extended his NFL-record streak to nine consecutive seasons with at least 30 TD passes, had nine career seasons with at least 30 touchdown passes, tied for the most in NFL history with Pro Football Hall of Famer Brett Farve and Peyton Manning.

Brees extended his NFL-record streak of seasons with at least 4,000 passing yards to 11, extended his NFL-record streak to 60 consecutive home games with a touchdown pass.

Brees has 58 career games with at least 300 passing yards and three touchdown passes, the most in NFL history.

Brees passed for four touchdowns and had a rushing touchdown in Week 12, his third career game with at least four touchdown passes and a rushing touchdown, the most in NFL history.

Brees passed for 465 yards in Week 6, his 15th career 400-yard game and surpassed Peyton Manning (14) for the most all-time.

ANTONIO BROWN – WR, Pittsburgh Steelers: Ranked second in the NFL with 106 catches and has 481 receptions over the past four seasons, surpassing Pro Football Hall of Famer Marvin Harrison (469 from 1999-2002) for the most catches in any four-year span in NFL history.

Brown has four consecutive seasons with at least 100 receptions, tying Marvin Harrison (four from 1999-2002) for the most consecutive 100-catch seasons in NFL history and reached 600 career receptions in Week 11 in his 96th career game, the fewest games to reach the milestone in NFL history.

DEZ BRYANT – WR, Dallas Cowboys: Had two touchdown catches and his first career touchdown pass in Week 16 and became the fifth player in NFL history with two touchdown catches and a touchdown pass in the same game.

DEREK CARR –  QB, Oakland Raiders: Has 81 career touchdown passes and is the fifth player in NFL history with 80 touchdown passes in his first three seasons.

In Week 8, Carr passed for 513 yards, four touchdowns and no interceptions in the Raiders’ 30-24 overtime win at Tampa Bay and became the third quarterback in NFL history to pass for at least 500 yards and four touchdowns without an interception in a single game.

BRANDIN COOKS – WR, New Orleans Saints: Had a 98-yard touchdown reception on Kickoff Weekend and an 87-yard touchdown catch in Week 6 and became first player in NFL history with two touchdown catches of at least 85 yards in his team’s first five games of a season.

AMARI COOPER – WR, Oakland Raiders: Had 83 receptions, 1,153 receiving yards and five touchdown catches and became the third player in NFL history to have at least 70 receptions, 1,000 receiving yards and five touchdown catches in each of his first two career seasons, joining Odell Beckham, Jr. (2014-2015) and Marques Colston (2006-2007).

KIRK COUSINS – QB, Washington Redskins: Ranked third in the NFL with 4,917 passing yards.

Cousins became the second player in NFL history (Aaron Rodgers, 2008-09) to have at least 4,000 passing yards and four or more rushing touchdowns in consecutive seasons.

STEFON DIGGS – WR, Minnesota Vikings: Became the first player in NFL history to have at least 13 catches in consecutive games (Weeks 9-10).

EZEKIEL ELLIOTT – RB, Dallas Cowboys: Became the fifth rookie since 1970 to lead the NFL in rushing yards (1,631) and the first since Edgerin James in 1999.

Elliott’s 1,631 rushing yards are the third-highest single-season total by a rookie in NFL history, trailing only Pro Football Hall of Famer Eric Dickerson (1,808 in 1983) and George Rogers (1,674 in 1981).

Elliott ad five games with at least 125 rushing yards, trailing only Eric Dickerson (seven in 1983) for the most by a rookie.

Elliott became the first rookie running back to have a 60+ yard touchdown run and an 80+ yard touchdown catch in a season since Pro Football Hall of Famer Gale Sayers in 1965 and rushed for 130+ yards in four consecutive games (Weeks 3-6), the only rookie in NFL history to accomplish the feat.

RHETT ELLISON – TE, Minnesota Vikings: Had a one-yard touchdown run to give the Vikings a 16-13 lead with 23 seconds remaining in the fourth quarter in Week 9. Ellison, whose touchdown run was the first carry of his five-year career, became the first player in NFL history to score a go-ahead touchdown in the final minute of regulation on the first carry of his career.

LARRY FITZGERALD – WR, Arizona Cardinals: Led the NFL with 107 receptions and at 33 years, 123 days old, became the oldest player to lead the league in receptions since Pro Football Hall of Famer Jerry Rice (34 years, 71 days) in 1996.

Fitzgerald has 1,125 career receptions and moved into third place on the all-time receptions list has 104 career touchdown receptions, the eighth-most all-time.

Fitzgerald had 1,116 career receptions through his 200th career game in Week 15 and surpassed Jerry Rice (1,115) for the most catches in a player’s first 200 games in NFL history.

MATT FORTÉ – RB, New York Jets: Became one of only four players in NFL history with at least 50 rushing touchdowns (52), 500 receptions (517) and 20 receiving touchdowns (20), joining Pro Football Hall of Famers Marcus Allen and Marshall Faulk and Herschel Walker.

WILL FULLER – WR, Houston Texans: Became the first rookie drafted in the first round to have at least 100 receiving yards in each of his team’s first two games of a season.

Became the only rookie in NFL history to have 300 or more receiving yards (323) and a punt-return touchdown in his team’s first four games of a season.

ANTONIO GATES – TE, San Diego Chargers: Had seven touchdown receptions in 2016, bringing his career total to 111 and tying Tony Gonzalez (111) for the most touchdown catches by a tight end in NFL history.

TED GINN JR. – WR, Carolina Panthers: Had an 88-yard touchdown catch in Week 12 and became the fourth player in NFL history to have a receiving touchdown, punt-return touchdown and kickoff-return touchdown of at least 85 yards each in his career.

FRANK GORE – RB, Indianapolis Colts: Moved into eighth place on the all-time rushing list with 13,065 career yards.

Gore rushed for 1,025 yards in 2016, his ninth career season with at least 1,000 yards, the fifth-most all-time and is the fifth player in NFL history with at least 12,500 rushing yards (13,065) and 400 receptions (414).

Gore is the only player in NFL history with 11 consecutive seasons with 1,200+ scrimmage yards.

A.J. GREEN – WR, Cincinnati Bengals: Has nine career games with at least 150 receiving yards, the fourth-most by a player in his first six seasons.

ROB GRONKOWSKI – TE, New England Patriots: Has 23 career games with at least 100 receiving yards, the third-most by a tight end in NFL history.

CASEY HAYWARD – CB, San Diego Chargers: Led the NFL with a career-high seven interceptions.

JOHNNY HEKKER – P, Los Angeles Rams: Set the single-season NFL record with 51 punts inside the 20-yard line.

TYREEK HILL – WR-PR-KR, Kansas City Chiefs: Joined Pro Football Hall of Famer Gale Sayers as the only players with at least five receiving touchdowns (six), three rushing touchdowns (three), a punt-return touchdown (two) and a kick-return touchdown (one) in a single season.

Hill scored on a three-yard run, a three-yard reception and an 86-yard kickoff-return in Week 12 and became the first player since Sayers in 1965 to have a rushing touchdown, receiving touchdown and kickoff-return touchdown in the same game.

JORDAN HOWARD – RB, Chicago Bears: Ranked second in the NFL with 1,313 rushing yards, the third-highest total by a rookie not chosen in the first four rounds of the NFL Draft. Alfred Morris (1,613 yards in 2012) and Mike Anderson (1,487 in 2000) are the only players drafted outside of the first four rounds with higher totals in their rookie season.

DE SEAN JACKSON – WR, Washington Redskins: Had an 80-yard touchdown catch in Week 14, his 22nd career touchdown of at least 60 yards, the second-most in NFL history.

SEBASTIAN JANIKOWSKI – K, Oakland Raiders: Has made 55 career 50+ yard field goals and surpassed Jason Hanson (52) for the most in NFL history.

DAVID JOHNSON – RB, Arizona Cardinals: Led the NFL in scrimmage yards (2,118) and touchdowns (20). Set an NFL record with 15 consecutive games with at least 100 scrimmage yards to begin a season.

Johnson tied Pro Football Hall of Famer Barry Sanders (15) as the only players in NFL history to record 15 consecutive games with at least 100 scrimmage yards in a single season.

Johnson has 24 rushing touchdowns, eight receiving touchdowns and a kickoff-return touchdown in his career and joined Pro Football Hall of Famer Gale Sayers as the only players in NFL history with at least 20 rushing touchdowns, five receiving touchdowns and a kickoff-return touchdown in a player’s first two seasons.

Johnson has scored multiple touchdowns in 11 career games, tying Pro Football Hall of Famer Eric Dickerson and Edgerrin James for the most such games in a player’s first two seasons in NFL history.

JULIO JONES – WR, Atlanta Falcons: Led the NFC with 1,409 receiving yards.

Jones had 475 catches through his 75th career game in Week 10, the most receptions in NFL history by a player in his first 75 games, had 7,306 career receiving yards through his 75th career game and became one of two players in league annals with at least 7,000 receiving yards in his first 75 games (Pro Football Hall of Famer Lance Alworth, 7,532).

TRAVIS KELCE – TE, Kansas City Chiefs: Led NFL tight ends with 1,125 receiving yards and ranked second with 85 receptions.

Had at least 100 receiving yards in four consecutive games from Weeks 11-14, tied for the longest such streak by a tight end in NFL history.

JARVIS LANDRY – WR, Miami Dolphins: Has 288 career receptions, tied with Odell Beckham, Jr. for the most receptions in a player’s first three seasons in NFL history.

ANDREW LUCK – QB, Indianapolis Colts: Reached 15,000 career passing yards in Week 1 in his 56th career game, tied for the second-fastest in NFL history.

Luck has seven career game-winning touchdown passes in the final two minutes of the fourth quarter, the most in a player’s first five seasons in NFL history.

ELI MANNING – QB, New York Giants: Has 320 career touchdown passes, the seventh-most in NFL history.

Manning has 4,072 career completions and became the seventh player in NFL history to reach 4,000 completions and moved into eighth place on the all-time passing yards list with 48,214 career yards.

MARCUS MARIOTA – QB, Tennessee Titans: Threw multiple touchdown passes in eight consecutive games from Weeks 5-12, the second-longest single-season streak in NFL history by a quarterback in his first two seasons, trailing only Pro Football Hall of Famer Dan Marino’s streak of 10 games in 1984.

Mariota became the first quarterback in NFL history to have three games with a 70.0+ completion percentage, at least four touchdown passes and no interceptions in his first two seasons.

VANCE MC DONALD – TE, San Francisco 49ers: Had a 75-yard touchdown catch in Week 2 and a 65-yarder in Week 9 and became the fourth tight end since 1970 and the first since 1997, with two touchdown catches of at least 65 yards in the same season.

DE MARCO MURRAY – RB, Tennessee Titans: Led the AFC with 1,287 rush yards.

In Week 10, Murray rushed for 123 yards, including a 75-yard touchdown and threw a 10-yard touchdown pass and became the first non-quarterback since Pro Football Hall of Famer John Henry Johnson in 1960 (December 11, 1960) to have a 75+ yard touchdown run and a touchdown pass in the same game.

Murray also became the first player to record a touchdown run of at least 75 yards and a touchdown pass in the first quarter of the same game since Pro Football Hall of Famer Jim Thorpe accomplished the feat for the Cleveland Indians in 1921 against the Columbus Panhandles.

Murray had 756 rushing yards and eight total touchdowns through Week 8, becoming the sixth player in NFL history with at least 750 rushing yards and eight touchdowns in his first eight games with a team.

LATAVIUS MURRAY –  RB, Oakland Raiders: Rushed for 114 yards and three touchdowns in the Raiders’ 30-20 victory against Denver in Week 9, marking the third time a player has rushed for at least 100 yards and three touchdowns against the defending Super Bowl champions.

JORDY NELSON – WR, Green Bay Packers: Led the NFL with 14 touchdown receptions.

Has three seasons with at least 13 touchdown catches in his career, tying Pro Football Hall of Famers Lance Alworth, Cris Carter and Marvin Harrison for the fourth-most in NFL history.

CAM NEWTON – QB, Carolina Panthers: Has 21,772 passing yards and 3,566 rushing yards in his career and is the only player in NFL history to have at least 20,000 passing yards and 3,000 rushing yards in his first six seasons.

YANNICK NGAKOUE – DE, Jacksonville Jaguars: Was the only rookie in the NFL with at least eight sacks (eight) and four forced fumbles (four).

GREG OLSEN – TE, Carolina Panthers: Had 1,073 receiving yards and became the first tight end in NFL history to record three consecutive seasons with at least 1,000 receiving yards.

CORDARRELLE PATTERSON – WR-KR, Minnesota Vikings: Had a 104-yard kickoff-return touchdown in Week 11 and became the first player in league history with four career touchdowns of 100+ yards.

JULIUS PEPPERS – LB, Green Bay Packers: Has 143.5 career sacks and surpassed Pro Football Hall of Famer Michael Strahan (141.5) for the fifth-most sacks since 1982, the first year individual sacks became an official statistic.

JASON PIERRE-PAUL – DE, New York Giants: Had a career-high three sacks, a forced fumble and a 43-yard fumble-return touchdown in Week 12 and became the first player with at least three sacks and a fumble-return touchdown of at least 40 yards in the same game since 1982.

DONTARI POE – DT, Kansas City Chiefs: Had 1.5 sacks in 2016 and threw a two-yard touchdown pass in Week 16, becoming the first player with a touchdown pass and a sack in the same season since the sack became an official statistic in 1982.

MATT PRATER – K, Detroit Lions: Converted a 58-yard field goal as time expired in the fourth quarter to force overtime in the Lions’ 22-16 win at Minnesota in Week 9, marking the second-longest game-tying field goal in the final minute of the fourth quarter in NFL history.

DAK PRESCOTT – QB, Dallas Cowboys: Had 13 wins as a starter, tied with Ben Roethlisberger (2004) for the most wins by a rookie starting quarterback in NFL history.

Prescott passed for 23 touchdowns with four interceptions and his 0.9 interception percentage is the lowest by a rookie quarterback in NFL history (minimum 200 passing attempts), h ad 11 games with a 100+ passer rating, tied for the third-most in a single season in NFL history and finished the season with a 104.9 passer rating, the highest single-season passer rating by a rookie quarterback in NFL history.

Prescott had multiple touchdown passes in five consecutive games in Weeks 6-11, tied for the longest such streak by a rookie in NFL history, had 176 pass attempts without an interception to begin the season, surpassing Tom Brady (162) for the most pass attempts without an interception to start a career.

Prescott completed 32 of 36 passes (88.9 percent) for 279 yards in Week 15, the second-highest completion percentage in a single game in NFL history (with a minimum of 30 attempts).

TERRELLE PRYOR SR. – WR, Cleveland Browns: Joined Marlin Briscoe as the only players in NFL history with 1,000 receiving yards (1,007 in 2016) in one season and 1,000 passing yards in another (1,798 in 2013).

Pryor had 144 receiving yards, 35 passing yards and 21 rushing yards (including a touchdown) in Week 3 and became the first player to have at least 120 receiving yards, 30 passing yards and 20 rushing yards in a single game since Pro Football Hall of Famer Frank Gifford on December 6, 1959.

JORDAN REED – TE, Washington Redskins: In Week 4, reached 200 career receptions in his 38th game, the fastest tight end in NFL history to reach 200 career catches, surpassing Pro Football Hall of Famer Kellen Winslow (39 games).

JALEN RICHARD – RB, Oakland Raiders: In Week 1, had a 75-yard rushing touchdown on his first career carry and became only the fourth player in NFL history with a 75+ yard rushing touchdown in his NFL debut.

MATT RYAN – QB, Atlanta Falcons: Ranked second in the NFL with 4,944 passing yards, his sixth consecutive 4,000-yard season, tying Peyton Manning(1999-2004) and Matthew Stafford (2011-2016) for the second-longest streak in NFL history.

Ryan led the NFL with a 117.1 passer rating in 2016, the fifth-highest single-season rating in NFL history, has 3,288 career completions and surpassed Peyton Manning (3,131) for the most completions in a player’s first nine seasons in NFL history.

Ryan threw a touchdown pass to 13 different players in 2016, the most in a single season in NFL history and has passed for at least 200 yards in 55 consecutive games, the longest streak in NFL history.

PHILIP RIVERS – QB, San Diego Chargers: Recorded his 11th consecutive season with 3,000 passing yards (4,386), tied for the fourth-longest streak in NFL history.

Has 314 career touchdown passes, the eighth-most in NFL history.

BEN ROETHLISBERGER – QB, Pittsburgh Steelers: Has 301 career touchdown passes and surpassed Pro Football Hall of Famer John Elway (300) for the ninth-most touchdown passes in NFL history and became the 10th player in NFL history to throw for at least 300 career touchdowns.

Roethlisberger reached 45,000 career passing yards in Week 10 in his 179th career game, the fifth-fastest quarterback in NFL history to reach the mark and is the eighth quarterback in NFL history to pass for 45,000 yards with one franchise.

AARON RODGERS – QB, Green Bay Packers: Led the NFL with 40 touchdown passes and became the fourth quarterback in NFL history to throw at least 40 touchdown passes in multiple seasons (45 in 2011), has 36,827 career passing yards and 2,544 rushing yards and joined Pro Football Hall of Famers John Elway (51,475 passing, 3,407 rushing) and Fran Tarkenton (47,003 passing, 3,674 rushing) and Donovan McNabb (37,276 passing, 3,462 rushing) as the only players in NFL history with at least 35,000 passing yards and 2,500 rushing yards in a career.

Rodgers as won 16 consecutive starts at Lambeau Field in the month of December and is the second player in NFL history to win 15 consecutive home starts in the month of December, joining Tom Brady (19 games from 2002-2012).

TREVOR SIEMIAN – QB, Denver Broncos: In Week 3, passed for 312 yards, four touchdowns and no interceptions for a 132.1 passer rating at Cincinnati and became the first player in NFL history to pass for at least 300 yards and four touchdowns without an interception in his first career road start.

STEVE SMITH SR. – WR, Baltimore Ravens: Moved into seventh place on the all-time receiving list with 14,731 career yards.

Smith ecame the 14th player in NFL history to reach 1,000 career catches (1,031) and is the only player in league history with at least 1,000 career catches (1,031), 1,000 punt-return yards (1,684) and 2,000 kickoff-return yards (2,371).

DARREN SPROLES – RB, Philadelphia Eagles: Is the first player in NFL history to have at least 30 career receiving touchdowns (30), 20 rushing touchdowns (22), a punt-return touchdown (seven) and a kick-return touchdown (two).

MATTHEW STAFFORD – QB, Detroit Lions: Led eight game-winning drives in the fourth quarter or overtime this season, the most such drives by a quarterback in a single season since 1970.

Stafford surpassed 30,000 career passing yards (30,303) in Week 17 in his 109th career game and became the fastest player to reach the mark in NFL history and passed for four touchdowns in Week 6 and at 28 years, 252 days old, became the fourth-youngest quarterback with 10 career four-touchdown passing games.

RYAN SUCCOP – K, Tennessee Titans: Converted a game-winning 53-yard field goal as time expired in the Titans’ 19-17 victory at Kansas City in Week 15. Succop, who spent five seasons with the Chiefs from 2009-13, became the first kicker in NFL history to defeat his former team by converting a game-winning, come-from-behind 50+ yard field goal as time expired.

AQIB TALIB – CB, Denver Broncos: Had a 46-yard interception-return touchdown in Week 2 and has nine career interception-return touchdowns, tied for the fourth-most in NFL history with Pro Football Hall of Famers Ken Houston, Deion Sanders and Aeneas Williams.

DEMARYIUS THOMAS – WR, Denver Broncos: Had 90 catches for 1,083 yards and five touchdowns and became the third player in NFL history with five consecutive seasons of 90+ receptions, 1,000+ recieving yards & 5+ TD catches.

JUSTIN TUCKER – K, Baltimore Ravens: Led the NFL with 38 made field goals and ranked second with 141 points.

Tucket cconverted all 10 of his field-goal attempts of at least 50 yards this season, tying Blair Walsh (Minnesota, 2012) for the most 50+ yard field goals made in a single season.

Tucker made all four of his field-goal attempts in the Ravens’ 19-14 win over Cincinnati in Week 12. Tucker, who connected on field goals of 57, 54 and 52 yards in the first half, became the first player in NFL history with three field goals of at least 50 yards in the first half of a game. His three 50+ yard field goals are tied for the most ever in a game and he became the ninth player in league annals to accomplish the feat.

ADAM VINATIERI – K, Indianapolis Colts: Converted 43 consecutive field goal attempts dating back to 2015, surpassing Mike Vanderjagt (42) for the longest streak in NFL history.

Vinatieri became the only player in NFL history to score 100+ points (125 in 2016) in 19 different seasons.

MIKE WALLACE – WR, Baltimore Ravens: Had a 95-yard touchdown reception in Week 9 and became the third player in NFL history (John Taylor and Gus Tinsley) to have two career 95+ yard touchdown receptions. Wallace is the only player in league annals to have a 95+ yard touchdown catch with two different teams (Baltimore and Pittsburgh).

DE MARCUS WARE – LB, Denver Broncos: Has 138.5 career sacks and surpassed Pro Football Hall of Famers Richard Dent (137.5) and John Randle (137.5) and Jared Allen (136.0) for the eighth-most sacks since 1982.

CARSON WENTZ – QB, Philadelphia Eagles: Passed for 769 yards with five touchdowns and no interceptions through Week 3 and became the only rookie in NFL history with a touchdown pass and no interceptions in each of his first three games to start a season.

Wentz guided the Eagles to a 3-0 start and became the first rookie since 1970 to start and win his team’s first three games to begin a season without throwing an interception.

RUSSELL WILSON – QB, Seattle Seahawks: Won his 50th career game as a starter in Week 6 in his 69th game, tied for the third-fastest starting quarterback to reach 50 career victories. Only Pro Football Hall of Famer Ken Stabler (62) and Tom Brady (65) reached the feat in fewer games.

Wilson has 34 career home wins as a starter, surpassing Joe Flacco and  Matt Ryan for the most home wins by a starting quarterback in his first five NFL seasons, has 31 career games with multiple touchdown passes and no interceptions, the most by a player in NFL history in his first five seasons to begin a career.

JAMEIS WINSTON – QB, Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Passed for 4,090 yards and became the first player in NFL history to record at least 4,000 passing yards in each of his first two seasons (4,042 yards as a rookie in 2015).

Winston has 50 career touchdown passes and became the fifth player in league history to throw at least 50 touchdown passes in his first two seasons.

Winston threw his 40th career touchdown pass in Week 10 and at 22 years, 312 days old, became the youngest player in NFL history to reach 40 career touchdown passes.

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